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She says she thinks its a man who came months ago to do some work around the house and she believes he brings his ladder and gets in through a window since he does not ring the bell or come to the door. He just walks around the second floor of her home. Are auditory hallucinations a symptom of dementia?

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willidee15...the drug he is taking is haloperidol 5 mg every six hours. I give it at 9am 3pm and 9pm and it certainly has helped with the seeing of bugs and snakes. Of course, the "people" are a different story, but at least they aren't something to fear, just dead relatives. And they are welcome here. It is part of the "leaving process". He also had UTIs that caused problems but after that was cleared up, we then got the bugs and snakes. BTW, I also watch that we have NO animal programs on TV. Can't be too careful.
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My mother in law has this issue from time to time and its sometimes is realted to a urinary tract infection and or her medications. I know the UTI sounds strange but thats when it happens to her. It goes aways in a few days for her.
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Cindie: Oh, I so much can relate! Unfortunately, my mom lived 400 miles away so I had no choice but to move in with her. I tucked her in bed each night and recited bible verses to her as she was in the winter of her life.
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to Nancy50131 - what was the drug that helped your husband for the visual hallucinations . The neurologist Rx Seroquel and Trazadone for sleep but it does not seem to be helping
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I agree with posts. Call her MD. could be a urinary tract infection, effects of meds, etc. Best to find out
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My Mom was hallucinating...drinking soup..when she did not have any,people visiting her and eating fried chicken at 2:30 a.m. ... little kids playing games with her...all in 2 days..took her to emergency department...her oxygen was extremely low. She is on oxygen 24/7 and I have moved in with her (since 4/28/14).
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My mother had similar experiences. In the hospital, she became belligerent, then when she pooped the bed up because she had lost her olfactory sense, she couldn't smell the foul odor. Then at the NH, a man jumped out of his bed to assist her (of course, he was a staff member), "he went back to his hotel" (an untruth) and there's a man sleeping in my room on the floor."-another hallucination.
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My mother has Lewy body dementia and has been in a NH for almost 3 years. She had a phantom cat for some time - fell out of her wheelchair trying to pet it and taken to ER ... I bought her some stuffed animals and that cured that. Then she's worried that when my father comes to visit and stay over night (he's been gone 16 years) the staff won't know who he is. Then there's the man who sleeps under her bed every night who she doesn't mind at all ... in 6" of space?

At close to 90 her mind is away with the fairies. She keeps trying to get out of bed or her wheelchair by herself and falls ... just this last week she was taken to the ER and ended up with a black eye and 8 stitches above that eye. Alarm on her bed but by the time it goes off she's on the floor. One or two more falls, banging her head, after numerous strokes, it will be the end of her. Wonderful though the staff are, there's nothing that can be done.
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Does she have a psychiatrist? You may want to find one for her. Her dementia has manifested itself into hallucinations.
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Lewy Body dementia has hallucinations as a symptom. My mom had a lot of them. She had a lot of falls as well. Best of luck to you.
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My mom has dementia and hallucinations and is on Respridol and Mirtazipine. Nothing really helps with her.
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My mother thinks someone is in the house at times. I think it's because she is very vulnerable now...and has been a little more scared the last few years. I take care of her now...and assure her that no one is in the house but family...then she drops the subject.
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Visual and auditory hallucinations are a hallmark of dementias, especially Lewy Body Dementia. Your mom should have another complete neurological evaluation.
My mom also insisted that various workers were coming into her home, through a "secret stairwell" in her bedroom closet. Mom also sees "schoolchildren skipping in the living room," and "brown-spotted mice in the kitchen."
Mom would get very upset if we would tell her she was dreaming or hallucinating. So now, instead, we say, "I swept out the kitchen mice with a broom, and called the exterminator!" or "I just double-checked the bedroom closet with my 'MagLight'...everything has been locked and boarded up for the night."
Mom's neurologist did talk to her at some length, to make sure her hallucinations were not scary ones.
One has to adjust to the patient's new reality, as they will never, sadly, be coming back to ours.
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I understand this. We are living with six to ten people that "visit". He seems to enjoy the conversations, but gets frustrated that I do not see or hear them, so I just go along with it. I strongly advise you to tell the doctor about this. My husband began seeing snakes that bit him and bugs. He was prescribed a med that has helped this, thank God. When he insisted, I asked if he missed seeing the exterminator that had been here. He was most interested and asked if he "got the snake". I assured him it was gone. Sometimes gentle "lies" help. Reassurance is what she needs. If she isn't afraid that is good. Let her tell you about it. Just listen. Hugs and love as you go through this.
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From your post talking about "her home," it sounds as though mom may be living alone. Doesn't sound like she should be.
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I aggregate (collect these tidbits on
"Dave Mainwaring's Knowledge Network" )

Sunrise Syndrome,(sun?riz) a condition in which a person with Alzheimer's wakes up rising in the morning and their mind is filled with delusions which include include beliefs about theft, the patient's house not being their home, a spouse is an impostor, belief an intruder is in the house, abandonment, spousal and paranoia, people eavesdropping. Sometimes the person may carry over content of a dream.

AND Call her MD and ask about testing Something has gone wrong and you need to know what.
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My mom would have auditory hallucinations, and the Dr put her on risperdole. It really helped. Although she was convinced she was hearing these voices, she wasn't overly concerned about it other then to try to convince everyone else of it. She would just listen and talk to them. I was horrified, my mother was losing her mind and there was nothing I could do about it. Like I said, the drugs helped.
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Yes, check with her doctor.

Dementia can include auditory hallucinations. If that's what this is and this doesn't disturb her it is not necessary to treat it.

It may also be a misinterpretation of real noises. Something in my kitchen makes a noise a lot like the door opening from the garage. I've often expected it to be followed by one of my borders coming in, but I've learned that it is the fridge recycling (or something). She may be hearing real noises and just guessing wrong about what they are.

But do discuss it with her doctor. It could be something else. Better safe than sorry.
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I would discuss it with her doctor. Usually, any change in mental status is cause to investigate. She could have an infection or something else causing it. I'd also make sure there is no actual man who is coming over.

If it is an hallucination due to dementia, you can discuss it with her doctor. She may not be able to live alone anymore and she may want to treat it with medications. Although the present hallucination does not disturb her, others could and it could be very distressful for her. I would anticipate this before it happens.
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Call her MD and ask about testing her, bloodwork for kidney function, and an MRI for neurological evaluation. Something has gone wrong and you need to know what.
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