Mom was walking well up until about 6 months ago. Is that part of Alzheimer's? - AgingCare.com

Mom was walking well up until about 6 months ago. Is that part of Alzheimer's?

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Mom went from walking to using a walker to a wheelchair in 6 months. Now she can barely life her feet up.

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Patience..... Hospice told me that the physical therapist could come in and massage his legs and get the blood flowing. His legs are so weak. I ordered a wheel chair so I can get him to the beach and let me continue with my walking. NOT ON SAND.... He is getting weaker but I want to get him out into the sun.
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My mom is going through this right now. And it is happening fast! A month ago she was of sound mind. Today she her dementia has kicked in full force! She was walking, then shuffeling, then walker and now wheelchair. Short term memory is the worst because she can't remember that she can't walk!! She has been in rehab since her last fall but they are releasing her this Saturday to come back to my home. I am beyond stressed about this. I keep having to take deep breaths or I think I might have a heart attack!! I do feel like sometimes it is my fault but the reality is it is not. It is a sick disease. She also has colon cancer. About the coconut oil. How do you give it to them? I use coconut oil for so many thing and am exited to give some to mom to see if it helps.
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US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health Drugs Aging. 1999 Jul;15(1):15-28.

Drug-induced cognitive impairment in the elderly.

Moore AR1, O'Keeffe ST.
Abstract

Elderly people are more likely than younger patients to develop cognitive impairment as a result of taking medications. This reflects age- and disease-associated changes in brain neurochemistry and drug handling. Delirium (acute confusional state) is the cognitive disturbance most clearly associated with drug toxicity, but dementia has also been reported. The aetiology of cognitive impairment is commonly multifactorial, and it may be difficult to firmly establish a causal role for an individual medication. In studies of elderly hospital patients, drugs have been reported as the cause of delirium in 11 to 30% of cases. Medication toxicity occurs in 2 to 12% of patients presenting with suspected dementia. In some cases CNS toxicity occurs in a dose-dependent manner, often as a result of interference with neurotransmitter function. Drug-induced delirium can also occur as an idiosyncratic complication. Finally, delirium may occur secondary to iatrogenic complications of drug use. Almost any drug can cause delirium, especially in a vulnerable patient. Impaired cholinergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of delirium and of Alzheimer's disease. Anticholinergic medications are important causes of acute and chronic confusional states. Nevertheless, polypharmacy with anticholinergic compounds is common, especially in nursing home residents. Recent studies have suggested that the total burden of anticholinergic drugs may determine development of delirium rather than any single agent. Also, anticholinergic effects have been identified in many drugs other than those classically thought of as having major anticholinergic effects. Psychoactive drugs are important causes of delirium. Narcotic agents are among the most important causes of delirium in postoperative patients. Long-acting benzodiazepines are the commonest drugs to cause or exacerbate dementia. Delirium was a major complication of treatment with tricyclic antidepressants but seems less common with newer agents. Anticonvulsants can cause delirium and dementia. Drug-induced confusion with nonpsychoactive drugs is often idiosyncratic in nature, and the diagnosis is easily missed unless clinicians maintain a high index of suspicion. Histamine H2 receptor antagonists, cardiac medications such as digoxin and beta-blockers, corticosteroids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics can all cause acute, and, less commonly, chronic confusion. Drug-induced confusion can be prevented by avoiding polypharmacy and adhering to the saying 'start low and go slow'. Special care is needed when prescribing for people with cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis of drug-induced confusion, and withdrawal of the offending agent or agents is essential.
PMID: 10459729 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



By Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
© Copyright of Telegraph Media Group Limited 2015
4:22PM GMT 26 Jan 2015

Over-the counter hayfever tables, sleeping pills or asthma drugs significantly raise the risk of developing dementia, a study has shown.
Taking a daily dose of pills like Benadryl, Piriton and Nytol, for at least three years, can increase the chance of getting Alzheimer’s disease by more than 60 per cent.
Researchers at the University of Washington said pensioners taking over-the-counter drugs should tell their doctors and stop taking medication immediately if it is not needed.
The drugs are known as ‘anticholinergics’ which work by blocking acetylcholine, a chemical involved in the transmission of electrical impulses between nerve cells. People with Alzheimer's disease are known to lack acetylcholine and it is feared the pills may exacerbate or trigger the condition.
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Dana, I learned in an Alzheimer's caregiving course a few years ago that there is another method to diagnose Alzheimers besides autopsy. It's through a spinal tap.
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Jess & Johnjoe, thanks for the coconut oil advice! Sounds promising.
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Interesting post, Sivasdad. Kudos to you in your persistence identifying his real condition. I wonder how many people are incorrectly diagnosed with AD. I believe the only truly accurate diagnosis of AD is autopsy. Someone correct me if I am wrong. I've been told to fight the Alzheimer diagnosis as they get "categorized". Oregongirl, I thought Johnjoe made a great suggestion to talk to your dad's doctor separately. Some doctors do not want to agitate patients by discussing in great detail what is potentially ahead of them when there is nothing they can do about it, especially if the patient doesn't pursue or understand the discussion. My own father still denies he has vascular dementia, denies he had a stroke, even though we have the hospital and rehab paperwork to prove it. It is hard for him to walk now but we ask him to try short trips and try to divert him because we know you lose it when you don't use it. His dementia has not been a constant downward plunge. He has plateaued a few times. Still eats well (with company) but we have to remind him because he has no natural hunger and time means nothing.
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My FIL (age 88) had mild dementia then went down hill rapidly - within 6 months, he could barely walk, complaining that his feet were sticking to the floor. It looked just like that too. Confusion, imbalance, falls, worse memory, urinary urgency. After several fumbled doctors visits we found out it was "normal pressure HYDROCEPHALUS". The fluid on his brain was not able to drain naturally and so his brain was under pressure. Everything was getting much worse quickly. He is 3 weeks post-op from getting a shunt put in his brain to drain the fluid continuously. The difference is night and day! He is walking confidently upright instead of needing a transport chair and also has much less urination urgency (it typically makes you incontinent). He is thinking clearer and involved in conversation again. Oh yes, they found a bladder infection while in the hospital so treated that too. Read about the symptoms online, it's pretty clear.

He's coming home from rehab tomorrow where he had 5-6 days of physical therapy where they evaluated what we could expect from him once he got home. We are looking forward to see how he does in this new state of mind and body!
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Hi Sendme2 help: I give coconut oil to My Mother Who's 86 years, and suffers from A/Zs these last 21/2 years. I give Mum a soup spoon full in Her food every day, + I take coconut oil Myself, as I'm dreadfully afraid of contracting this awful disease as well. ( HAS COCONUT OIL HELPED HER CONDITION?) Well I believe it has. When We Love Some One, We must TRY every thing.
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Sendme2help
We both take 2 tbs of virgin coconut oil at breakfast and supper. I use it cooking instead of butter or cooking oil. My wife usually sops up her oil with toast/bread, but we also use it on hot and cold cereal and as a salad dressing (with vinegar). I use it my coffee. Fruit smoothies work good. The oil is essentially tasteless and turns liquid at 76 degrees. I often take it straight from a spoon, but my wife doesn't like the oily feeling. An internet search for coconut oil recipes will turn up many. Dr Fife at coconut research center.org has good general info on the health benefits of the oil.

I credit it with significant improvement for my wife's dementia, not only balance, but also awareness and speech.
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Jess, what exactly do you do with the coconut oil, take some orally; use it for massage? My husband helps a patient with Parkinson's, who freezes up and cannot move.
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