Mom was sent to assisted living by hospice, and I was told that when she improves hospice could move her home. Is there a way to switch hospice companies? - AgingCare.com

Mom was sent to assisted living by hospice, and I was told that when she improves hospice could move her home. Is there a way to switch hospice companies?

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She has a bed sore, that was getting better, but now is getting worse. I have taken a course (Home Healthcare Aide) and believe that I can care for her now along with hospice but now the owner of assisted living said "NO". I have POA for mom and cannot continue paying for her to stay there for too much longer, and it was suggested that I want all her money and it would be elder abuse to send her home. I have made here house safe, and would like her to come home. I was totally misled by the Hospice person that I signed the papers with, because she said it would be no problem. Mom is not happy where she is at, not to mention the barking dogs, doesn't like the food, she tried to get out of bed so they put bed rails on, gets UTI often. Hospice does not communicate with me at all, which I thought it was for family too. Is there a way to switch hospice companies?

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Thank you garden artist, I am in Southern California, and will begin my calling tomorrow. Did start a list already. I appreciate the pointers. It's nice to be able to get insight from different people who are dealing with the same issues or similar.
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Kg, there is absolutely, totally and inexcusably no justification for moving your mother before discussing the issue with you. Do find another hospice company.

When I was looking for a Palliative Care company, I found that many of them also offer hospice service, so the company is already in a position to be the provider of choice if/when the patient needs hospice level care. Tiered service is probably a good idea, not only for client retention but for continuity of care. So I expanded my concept from just PC to include hospice care, if needed eventually.

As I've found with many private duty companies, some of these PC/hospice providers advise a potential client what THEY do, but do not necessarily focus on what the client or the family needs. I eliminated 2 well known PC/hospice providers very quickly when this attitude surfaced.

I've also raised this issue with doctors, and found a PC company I liked; it was the same one a doctor had used for care of his mother, although she was hospice ready at the time he hired this company.

Make your checklist and start calling other hospice companies. (If you're in Michigan, I can PM you with names of two companies to avoid.)
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Thank you freqflyer for insight appreciate it
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Thank you SueC1957 for your great insight, I guess I have a lot to consider. I really don't think mom qualifies for Medicaid as she has a pension and soc sec coming in monthly. Assisted living does cost more than the total so her savings is going down too. I am going to think about changing hospice, as I just don't think they are in the business for the right reason. I did feel kind of forced into signing her up, and then they moved her without telling me. Do you know what it is like to go to the room she was in and her bed was stripped and all her stuff was gone, and they had to look it up? Would have liked a phone call or something. Anyways thanks again for sharing.
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No one can tell you or your mother what to do. You are both adults and can choose where you live.
Hospice can go anywhere. If you're not satisfied with one, check out others.
I'm a hospice nurse and I have gone to nursing homes, memory care facilities and private homes. My hospice will provide "crisis care" if the patient is in distress- whether severe pain, intractable nausea or vomiting or respiratory distress or if the family members (c/g's) are at their wits end. We can do 8 hour shifts for 2-3 days or until the "crisis" has passed.
Other than that, they will come out as was explained above.

If you choose to bring your mom home, you have a huge job in front of you. You WILL need help every day for at least a few hours or you will burn out quickly. It's very difficult turning a bedridden person (without assistance) to sufficiently clean a soiled diaper or do bedsore care. 
I admire your intentions and I understand your feelings of guilt (that it's her house and you live there). I suggest you apply for Medicaid for her and find a good nursing home where she can get the care she needs.
I brought my mom home. It was overwhelming. After 3 months we had to place her in another memory care facility.

I suggest you stay with her in the facility for an entire shift. Do all her care for the whole 8 hours, then figure another 16 hours of the same work. That will be your life. My messed up back and arthritis in my neck are from 39 years of just this type of care.

I hope you find a good solution to your situation.
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sorry I guess I left a little bit of story out. Mom was taken to Hospital with a UTI and she was very weak. after 3 days in hosp was moved to rehab. They are the ones who called both assisted living and hospice. I met with hospice and signed some papers. No other meetings then they just moved her to the assisted living on a sat morning and when we went to visit her she was gone. I am prepared to do most of the work, my daughter also lives in the home and goes to college. I also have a brother in town but he is battling cancer at the moment. I figure its moms house and she lets me live here and my daughter too, that's why I owe her. I am also not so sure she is terminal, hospice used its own doctors for certification. Mom doesn't say much she is on oxygen still has catheter wears a diaper and cannot walk. But she still knows who she is and wants to go home. There have been a few issues at assisted living place like 4 dogs that bark almost constantly. Her falling off the bed, the bed sore getting bigger again, she doesn't eat most of the food just the goodies. Even if I had someone come for an hour or two a day, it would still be cheaper than assisted living. I know if they thought she had no more money they would let me take her.
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kg5866, you need to think about this.... while Mom is living in Assisted Living, she has a village of people helping her. If Mom goes back to her own home, will you be the only caregiver to cover all 3 shifts? Do you have siblings, other relatives, friends who could help you with Mom's care? Sounds like Mom needs to be re-positioned on a regular basis, would you be able to do that on your own?

I am curious why Hospice would remove your Mom from her home and place her into Assisted Living? Hospice can help people no matter where they live. As for Mom's health improving, there are cases where one no longer needs Hospice as they are doing so much better.

Please note that Hospice is not around the clock caregiving. You may get a half hour a day with a nurse stopping by to check vitals and to give meds.... and Aide to give Mom a bed bath.... a volunteer to chat with Mom or read her a book [no hands-on care].

As for communications, Hospice is available 24 hours a day if you have any questions.

Bed rails? Really? Most States have outlawed the use of bed rails as they were deemed to dangerous. Nursing Homes know how to keep a patient in bed most of the time. My late Mom was a climber, so they had to lower her bed, put fall mats around the bed, and try to tuck her in using pillows which would make it more difficult to climb out of bed.
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It sounds as thought you are being strong armed by predatory AL and/or hospice provider, lots of people on this forum have hospice care in the home.
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Yes. You can switch hospice companies anytime you want.
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