All of a sudden, Mom is thinking that her sister recently died, it's been six years since my Aunt passed. - AgingCare.com

All of a sudden, Mom is thinking that her sister recently died, it's been six years since my Aunt passed.

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I tried to reassure Mom by saying she must have had a vivid dream, so it feels real to her. She is also imagining that her brother's wife took things from her sister's home. I wonder what is happening in Mom's brain that is causing her to believe these stories.

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I think I would have a frank discussion with the neurologist, IF these delusions are not a result of a UTI, I'd ask him what is causing it. I've never heard of someone being fine, but having delusions and making false accusations. Those are classic symptoms of dementia. So, I'd insist on some answers. Maybe, even consult with a Geriatric psychiatrist.

When she sees the Neurologist, does he rely on only her responses or do you inform him of things she doing, such as incorrectly remembering someone's death and making false accusations against them. Does she have any other oddities that you have observed? Any, weight loss, lack of hygiene, loss of interest in activities, writing notes to herself, searching for the right word that is hard for her to find, agitation, etc?

Some people who have dementia also have depression. I'd discuss the med he's prescribed her and see if it's benefiting her. My mom takes Lexapro and it really has helped her mental state. (She doesn't have dementia.)
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I've seen others post that a UTI (or other undiagnosed infection) can cause confusion in elders, you might want to check that out.
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Up until a year ago, she had been seeing a neurologist every six months for an unrelated symptom which eventually got resolved with a pace maker. This was before they figured out it was her heart, the neurologist had wrongly put her on a drug for seizures.

At that point we made an appointment for mom to see another Neurologist with a different Group. After her appointment the other day, she is not scheduled until a year from now. With this new group she was evaluated by a Dr. once, and since has be seeing a specialist in gerontology.
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Sunnygirl 1 thank you. One of my concerns is that Mom has imagined and expressed annoyance that my other Aunt has taken things from my Mom's sister's home. I would not want Mom to hurt my other Aunt with unfounded accusations. I can see the stress that Mom is feeling thinking this is true. I try to talk to her about it, and then as you said move on to talk about something more cheerful. Until it comes up again.
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I don't think the average person isn't seeing a neurologist every 6 months, why is your mom? And is this doctor a specialist in dementia or gerontology?
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Thank you for your response. Mom had an appointment with neurology a week ago, I asked if it could be a form of mild dementia. The CRNP said she didn't recall diagnosing Mom with Dementia. I felt a bit like she was brushing off my question. Instead she thought Mom was experiencing anxiety, Lexapro was mentioned as an option. I think Mom does have anxiety, but would that cause her to be confused? Every six month appointment Mom has with neurology comes down to a diagnosis of normal age related symptoms, and an option to take a drug. Mom does not want to add more medications to the list of what she is presently taking. One of the side effects of Lexapro is diziness. I wish I knew how to help Mom to not feel confused. I tend to agree with her that another drug with side effects may not be the best answer.
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Your profile says that your mom has Alzheimers/dementia. Is that right?

Delusions or incorrect memories are quite common with these conditions. But, it's wise to report any change in mental status to her doctor. She could have a UTI or something else that is causing it.

If it is the dementia, I'd just try to assure and comfort her. Trying to explain how long since her sister died really isn't likely to work. The brain often does allow new information like that, so, I'd try to agree with beliefs, comfort her and then distract with a new topic. Such as, yes, we miss her and love her, but, she was such a wonderful person. Can you help me sort some Christmas cards to send to friends and family? Just something to get her mind on other happier subjects.
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Dementia of some sort is what's likely to be happening. Take her to the doctor for an evaluation.
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