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We moved her to our home state after experiencing same paranoia while in her home. She is fixated on a neighbor that is "following" her. Even though we made every effort to create anonymity for her she still believes this person and another neighbor are listening in on her conversation and paying people to follow her and kill her plants. By all accounts she is a functioning, very clean and methodical person, but these episodes of persecution are heightened when it rains and we don't visit her on a weekly basis. Any ideas and or suggestions on where to begin to get help?

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Toward the end of his life my father became paranoid and very scared. He thought people were coming in his room at night and plotting against him. While of course this wasn't true these were very real fears to my dad so I would tell him that I spoke to (insert name here) and I took care of it. My dad would feel relieved until the next time and I'd do the same thing again.
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So true. With that kind of paranoia, I would be very concerned with her living alone. I wouldn't let this slide. I would try to intervene before something serious happens.
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I meant to say you should be looking at the possibility that your mom should NOT be living alone anymore.
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I definitely think a visit to a MD that specializes in dementia/geriactrics is called for. Her paranoia could lead her to do things that might not be in her best interests.This could be an advancement of her dementia and perhaps you might start looking at the possibility that you mom should be living alone anymore. I'm not saying move her in with you, but be proactive and start looking at other living arrangements for her that would mean her not living alone.
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I would discuss it with her doctor as stated above to see if there's any medication that could help.

My loved one has been paranoid about various things. Her issues jump around and rarely does she have the same concern more than once. I just assure her that the problem she is worried about has been taken care of. I say that I knew she was worried about it and that I met with the people in charge, signed the paperwork and everything was now being straightened out so she had no reason to worry anymore. She thanks me and usually that will satisfy her until she forgets my response and I have to repeat it.
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Is this a change in mental status since the last time mom was seen by the doctor who is managing her dementia? If so, this should be reported to him/her. There are medications that may help.
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I just checked your profile and saw your mother does have dementia. Paranoia is very common with dementia. There is not much you can do except to listen and reassure. Maybe you can make up a story that the person had moved to Canada, so won't be able to bother her anymore. I think whatever works is good.
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I knew a woman in TX who felt the maintenance man and neighbors were doing things around her apartment. She thought they were putting stink bombs in the closet and doing things in her garden. She thought they were trying to scare her into moving. She went to the doctor and learned that she was having some small strokes. The paranoia she was feeling was probably vascular dementia from these small strokes. I still don't know what could have been responsible for the smell of stink bombs, but when it is neural, I guess all the senses may be affected.

I wondered if your mother may be having this same problem. It is definitely something you would want her doctor to look into.
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