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My mom has dementia and is seeing people and things in her room at night that scare her. we put a camera in her room to record and show her That no one is there but she says that they just can't be videoed. She said cant take it anymore. She's not sleeping because of her fear, she thinks they are there to kill her! How do I handle this?

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Thank you everyone, we checked for uti that was neg. we keep a light on in her room at night along with a baby monitor with a cam so she call call me in the middle of the night if she needs me. We do have a geriatric psychiatrist near by that I'm making an appointment with.
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yakmom


Your loved one could be seeing spirits from the other side
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We have had the same problem with my loved one. She is 88. We set up trail cameras outside b/c her fears were from things that outside. Her other son and DIL gave her one of those motion sensor beepers and she took it to bed with her so it was waking her up all through the night. She pushed her first alert button one night and had deputies out looking for things. We moved her sensor up to her door and it hasn't beeped at night at all since. Plus, we were getting great photos of grandchildren, the FedEx man, etc. in the daytime and zero night pictures. (yes it works at night b/c we have photos of deer, raccoons, etc. with this same camera). I cannot help the "seeing" people. She is virtually blind d/t macular degeneration, but can describe these people in detail. I have tried to get her an appt. with someone to no avail. So far, she is not endangering herself. Blessings to you all.
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08/25/16.... I agree with Sunny above about a possible urinary tract infection or any type of infection. Recent my Dad was seeing ants on the walls and in his food. He saw his primary doctor who found out he had a mild lung infection. It took awhile for the antibiotics to work, so in the mean time I told Dad what he was seeing were "floaters" in his eyes, told him I have those, and they can be annoying.

Twright, if your Mom sleeps in a totally dark room you might was to experiment with night lights or a low 25 watt lamp for night use. You can tell your Mom that when those night lights are on, the people won't come into her room. I don't know if that would work or not. It's worth a try.
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I think I might talk to her doctor about the hallucinations, just to rule out something else causing them, like a UTI. If they are due to the dementia, ask if there is any medication that might help her. I've read that the don't normally treat hallucinations, unless, it is really disturbing the patient, but I would explore it, since she is really frightened by them and is losing sleep. Loss of sleep can lead to other problems, so, I would take that very seriously.

What if you switched her room for a few nights to see if it happens in a different bedroom? Or what if someone stays with her in the room at night.?You could tell her that you have someone guarding the doors. I would try to give her security about them, because you will not be able to convince her they are not real. In fact that probably scares her more, so, I wouldn't tell her they are not real anymore. Can you convince her they are friendly people who are looking out for her and leaving gifts?

Is she normally anxious, worried or agitated? I would ask if treating those things could help with her nighttime problems.

A geriatric psychiatrist would be ideal, but if one is not available, as her primary for guidance. It could be a phase that passes, but, I don't think that I could wait on that possibility.
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The camera was a good idea however since your mom has dementia she can't reason properly as you're discovering. To her what she's seeing is very real and very scary. I doubt that you'll be able to talk her out of it rationally since she isn't rational.

Make her feel safe. Reassure her that you are there for her around the clock if she needs you and that you will always make sure she's OK. When my dad became fearful of things he thought he was seeing I told him over and over that I would never let anything happen to him. Provide comfort and reassurance to your mom.

Have you considered giving her something to help her sleep?
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