My Mom (POA), just passed away, and left my Father, who has late stage Alzheimer's. Any advice? - AgingCare.com

My Mom (POA), just passed away, and left my Father, who has late stage Alzheimer's. Any advice?

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My neice automatically took over my dad's finances, after my mom's passing, but does not have guardianship or POA over my father. She is living in his house with her son and boyfriend currently, she was living there prior to my mother's passing, and has nowhere else to live if my dad gets put into a facility. A few days ago my dad fell and hurt his arm, now I am the one taking care of him, but its not enough, he needs skilled nursing, what steps do I take to get guardianship?, but the more important question, who do I contact to get my dad more help?

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My guess is that you should. Find a local attorney who does eldercare work. You'll have to figure out his estate and any medicare/Medicaid issues. Is the niece the caregiver? Are you good with this?
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I found the POA paperwork, it only appoints my dad POA, the paperwork for POA was drawn up 15 years ago, my mother never planned on my dad outliving her. So i guess i should file for guardianship?
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And thank you very much for the help
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Hi, mother had POA, she recently passed, and left nobody ward over my dad
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Royddeal, what does your Dad's power of attorney says? Sometimes a second person will be listed as POA if the first person is unable to continue as POA.
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Who does have POA if anyone? You need to contact an attorney to begin guardianship process, assuming Dad is clearly incompetent.

With late stage alz he should probably be in skilled nursing/ memory care. You may be able to make this happen with a letter from his doc explaining his diagnosis without actual guardianship. But you need to be able to take care of his financial and real estate affairs and that will require either POA or guardianship.
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