Why can't mom with Parkinson's stand or walk all of a sudden while walking?

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My mom who suffers from Parkinson's and is diabetic and some dementia as well can be walking and then it is like she has no legs to stand on or she says she can't move her legs, I don't understand why she can't either stand or walk. Please help?

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The medication wears off suddenly, leaving your mom frozen. This happens to me all day long when the meds are gone and the next dose is an hour away. I will stay frozen and trembling in my bed waiting for the next dose and then an additional 45 minutes until dopamine gets in the brain. Your mom needs an adjustment with her meds, closer together so she will have a more even amount of dopamine. It is very hard to endure being able to walk and then in minutes froen. Her Dr. should have no problem adjusting meds to make her life better.
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This is part of the progression of the illness. Often at this juncture they cannot process instructions. I always have a wheelchair behind husband to place him in at this juncture.
This fluctuates from hour to hour. My husband has Lewy Body Dementia & in most cases Parkinson's follows this. Like you state this is a concern as falls can occur. I hope you ask for emotional support for yourself.
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The drugs they take for Parkinson's can also come into play. My client with Parkinson's was really hard to keep "on track" with meds that could not be taken within an hour of consuming protein, or sugar. She would take her meds, sneak off and dig into her candy stash and we'd have a good hour of her sitting, frozen, and speechless in her chair. She was willing to endure the discomfort for the sake of having sweets. I don't know if this is still the case. She too, would be walking along and then freeze....it took some education on my part to be PATIENT with her and help her get moving again. Also, I know she had a lot of pain but her family would not allow her to take anything for it. At the end of my time with her, I did talk to her SIL (with whom she lived, and who was a DR!!! if she could please take an ibuprofen for the pain. He said he was completely uninvolved with her care--but the next time I went to work, voila! She was allowed ONE 200 mg ibuprofen per day.)
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Pain occurs similar to sciatica. My husband thinks this not part of Parkinson or freezing. Is it, could it be
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Parkinson's disease, being a progressive disorder of nervous system generally affects a person's movement and coordination and gets worse as time passes. In addition, long-term care alzheimer's disease, according to infolongtermcare.org can lead to loss of motor skills. This explains why your mom displays inability to carry out motor activities. While she may be taking medication for parkinson's, it may be Alzheimer's that is causing the problem, gradual progress of alzheimer's disease may render long-term care patients to lose functions like dressing, chewing and even walking.
I suggest you discuss these symptoms with your mom's healthcare provider immediately. Good luck and keep your patience.
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My Mom has Dementia and very probably Alzheimer's. But Mom recently had an episode where she just couldn't walk. She would move her hands and push and pull as if it would help. I leaned over for something and when I stood up she put her hands on my shoulders. She would follow me anywhere I wanted her to go. But he minute I stood beside her instead of in front of her "she froze". I call it her "mind to motion problem". She just needs my will to move her instead of her own. Whatever it takes! Hang in There!
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Parkinson’s Disease is a degenerative nervous system disorder that impairs movement and cognitive function, making everyday life more difficult. The symptoms often show up gradually, worsening with time.
Home care services provide a professional level of supervision and care, while also allowing the Parkinson’s patient to experience the benefits of being around loved ones and maintaining a reasonable level of independence.
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Pinkginny is right. Giving Parkinsons patients an alternative thought process can help the freezing problem. I've heard of the laser method, and there's even a new walker on the market with a built-in laser feature that gives them something to focus on. I've told my mom to pretend she is stepping over a log. That cues her to pick up her foot and get moving again.

And Kathyt1 is right too. The forget how to shift their weight from one foot to the other and end up sort of waddling from side to side, which does nothing but wear them out. So I frequently have to remind my mom to "shift and lift." Simple one or two word cues are best. It's hard for them to process longer commands while they're concentrating on trying to walk.
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Another good resource for Parkinson's info is the American Parkinson's Disease Association. They have a lot of booklets for every Parkinson's symptom you can think of. They also have a booklet for caregivers.
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When freezing occurs this helps my Dad who has parkinson's As if you are doing the hulu, shift weight from one hip to the other, then shift weight again, then shift again, then move foot forward.
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