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Mom went to 3 weeks of rehab , she did fantastic while there . When she was discharged she was stand by assist walked 50 feet . She comes home and the next day she does great and now the 4th day heck no she won't do anything. She would rather be pushed in the wheelchair then walk and she can walk . She has Alzheimer's and dementia and also arthritis and bil blood clots in her legs .. So I know she has pain . I'm a Rehab RN and I medicate her prior to getting up and walking her . My sister Geri passed away August 10 2013 age 49 of sudden cardiac death she also was a RN so we both took care of mom but I'm on my own now.i told her mom you have to walk , I have to get up a hour early for work so i can get you up .. She said then get up 2 hours early ... I said that would be 0400 .. She said so what ? I work 12 hour shifts I said you can't believe I'll do that . So do I argue with her make her walk or give up and let her use the wheelchair ? I told her she has to keep mobile I have psoriatic arthritis myself and have gone pain.i tell her mom you have to walk she said no I won't .... But she did great in therapy ... what would you do ? Has anyone ever had this problem ? Thank you in advance

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This is just an observation with regard to my parents back when they were receiving rehab for various medical issues.... if Mom had a female physical therapist Mom wasn't that attentive, oh she did her exercises but not with the gusto when the therapist was a young fellow. Same with Dad, the younger and cuter the PT was, the more he worked on his exercises so he could impress her the next session :)

Even though Mom's physical therapy was 15 years ago, she [97] still does all her exercises daily according to what "Brian" had showed her. Dad on the other hand, once the PT stopped, he stopped doing his exercises... [sigh].
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You've gotten a lot of good advice here.

What are the goals of her physical therapy treatment?

I would just add that after reading a lot about dementia, discussing it with the Memory Care staff, and her doctor, I realized that my expectations of my loved one conforming to normal behavior is not reasonable. I can't expect my loved one to understand the benefits of physical therapy. I can't expect them to feel the accomplishment of hard work in therapy. Their brain likely won't allow it. My reasoning is that of an undamaged brain. I can't force her to get it. At some point I have to ask if my expectations are reasonable.

Maybe for some reason she was more prone to therapy while at the center. She may or may not ever return to that level. Their ability for certain tasks fluctuate from day to day.

My loved one fell and fractured her spine and later her hand. Due to her dementia, Traditional physical therapy was not feasible for her. I would find a plan of treatment that she is able to cooperate with and that doesn't cause undue anxiety for you.
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we could never get mom to do as much walk ing n exercise as she did in rehab. Some weeks she would do more for my brother and the aides... Sometimes I could get her to do more than they could. Sometimes she flat out refuse no matter who tried. just all kept at it so each day she was doing at least something! Keep at it! Goodluck
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Heck ya those places are like being in jail she wanted to go home now she's home she wants to rest in places like that you don't sleep good you share toilets eat what your feed and like it and do any thing to get out she's out she needs to get a normal day agine and rest full sleep non poke and prod can you see her sid
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One thing with my Mom is she is certainly more cooperative with others than she is with me. Home was the place she could do as she pleased and she was often at her worst with me, the peraon she knew best. Maybe a video or note from the doctor to remind her why she must move, that you could use over and over and over again would convince her. That is if she is still able to read. My mom is entering the later stages of AD and, yes she is still able to read, which many find amazing, but that ability is going slowly. She will however, spend hours on one paragraph, if not sentence, as her cognitive ability to put meaning to sentences and paragraphs is long gone.
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As my moms dementia progressed and mobility decreased. She had Lewy body dementia. I would tell her we have to do something and I would do it with her. I would put my chair facing her and we would do the leg exercises together. I would also have my dad do them too. They sat side by side in recliners. All meals were only provided in the kitchen, thus was another walk. I noticed that mom was more cooperative after she had her breakfast but before lunch. Some days I was able to get extra walks, some days not. Don't beat yourself up, you can encourage thru bribery that may work. I would tell my mom if she walked and/or exercised in the morning then we could go outside in the afternoon for a walk. I would walk and push her in the wheelchair. Good luck
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Oh, you KNOW that arguing with folks with Alzheimer's doesn't work. Folks with dementia are very self-referential and don't have the brain cells to realize the impact of their actions, either on themselves or on others (like getting up at 4 AM or the fact that if she doesn't walk, she'll lose the ability). Are you dead set against having her in a care facility? She'd probably walk for others; in fact, does she walk for the caregivers who come in? If she does, I'd leave her alone when you're home.
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Ohme, seems like you have lots of help. Maybe it was peer pressure in rehab? Maybe facility living would be best, give her a reason to want to move. People to see and things to do. Day care? Something at home is not motivating her. Maybe it is too easy for her to manipulate people so she gets what she wants.
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Oversees spell check spelled it wrong lol
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She also has PT Ot a Cna and a RN who overseas the care she also has a LPN that comes ... I specialized in Rehab Nursing so I make sure all my bases are covered . I just don't understand why she turns into momzilla when she gets home
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Sorry forgot to mention I have caregivers for my 12 hour shifts . I have plenty of help , she knows them well and they talk about the good old days
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I also wonder what ahe does during the day while you are at work. PT is a very good idea to come in a couple of times a week. What about a day program, keep her engaged with others and may give her incentive to keep moving. I would also tell her that it is going to have to be assisted living because without movement, muscles will atrophy, and you will not provide for her care if she does not do her part. But reasoning will not work in dementia. Is there a reason you brought her home after rehab instead of moving her to a memory care facility?
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I haven't had that problem, but I can understand that it could be very frustrating.

I'm wondering if your mother isn't cooperating because she doesn't have the social stimulus as well as the other residents doing PT as well as she had in the nursing home. Not only is there often conversation, but sometimes residents can get competitive with others in PT and that acts as an incentive to work out.

Is there anyone with her during the day? Can you get her doctor to script for home PT and possibly OT if she needs it?

Another possibility is to get her one of the reasonably priced pedalers. They're essential bike pedals mounted in either a lightweight frame or a more expensive one, as the rehab facilities use. They can be attached to a table for arm use or just put on the floor for leg use. It would help her keep her leg strength up but allow her to just sit while doing it.
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Bone pain not gone pain sorry typo
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