Mom makes almost a moaning or throat clearing noise that may be self soothing. Anyone else experience this? - AgingCare.com

Mom makes almost a moaning or throat clearing noise that may be self soothing. Anyone else experience this?

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She is 79, has Parkinsons and mobility issues. She has some very mild dementia. She gets alittle agitated when I ask her about the noises she is making. I've very convinced she isn't in pain. She usually makes these noises while she is going through her stuff or papers, etc. Anyone else had any similiar experiences? I haven't found anyone that can help with the explanation.....I don't want to try to stop her if it's emotionally soothing, and honestly I don't know if I could stop her. It can be very irritating since she will do if for quite awhile, but if there was a reason behind it, it would be less irritating.

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Gene makes all kinds of noises... and I know he doesn't realize he is doing it....the only thing I do is try to tune it out... but it can get in your head, so I understand... and I notice it more when he is relaxed.... but as was said, make sure the doc knows and go from there...but I agree that others, visitors, will have to adjust.... so few things our elders get to do that brings them comfort... if it's noise.... so what... screaming and throwing things is different... it just shows how much you want her to have the best quality of life by asking the questions... I have often suggested headphones or ipods made especially for caregivers.... where we can tune out all the annoying stuff, yet hear them when we need to.... wouldn't that be great... I know if I could jam to some PinkFloyd C would not bother me near is much !!!!
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My grandmother used to hum. Whole piano concertos, by the end of her life. It was disconcerting if you were sitting next to her at lunch - sudden passages of Rachmaninov, crescendo - but otherwise harmless. If your mother finds it upsetting when you ask about it, then don't - she can't explain and why would you need to stop her doing it even if you could? I suppose there's no harm in reminding her, for example if you're in company, that other people might find it alarming; but frankly those other people will just have to cope.

I agree that you should report it, though, along with any other changes in behaviour you notice.
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Thanks for the response. I've never had a doctor mention this symptom to me, nor have I seen it in research. We have an appointment soon.
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It is part of the Parkinsons advancing and should be discussed with her MD. It gives the doctor a better sense of what stage the patient is in if you can roadmap the symptoms.
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