My Mom keeps falling out of beds/chairs. Any advice?

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Mom fell several months ago and broke her hip. Since the fall she has gotten full blown dementia. We have put her in assisted living and she is also on Hospice. We have added a bed alarm to her bed, but somehow she still falls out of the bed with rails and falls out of her lift chair that is sitting flat. I get a minimum 1 call a night and some during the day hours to alert me she has fallen. So far she hasn't gotten hurt, but every time the phone rings I'm afraid that it's going to be the call that she has. We've asked/told her not to get up without paging for assistance, but she never does. Last night the nurse had just gone in to check on her and was getting her medicine. Ten minutes later she walked back into mom's room with her medicine and found mom on the floor.Mom tells us she needs to clean or take care of the children that she thinks is in the room or bed with her. She has the alert necklace and bed alarm. My next step is to get a baby monitor that will stay with the nurse that is assigned to her. I'm trying to get that approved now. The doctors are tweaking meds, etc. I'm at wits end and don't know what else to do. Any suggestions out there?

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My Mom's AL would allow no kind of restraint. I had a small "rail" (if you want to call it) to help her pull herself up in bed. Yes, it helped to keep her from falling out but when the AL found out it was there, I had to take it out. No alarms on chairs. I was going to suggest a lower boxspring. Mom's was only five inches high. She liked the mattress she had that was only about 6 or 7 inches high (unlike the new ones that are 10 to 12) So this made a shorter distance to fall. Have they thought about a sleeping pill? I think getting the lower bed and mats on the floor is as good as you are going to do. Even in longterm nursing here in NJ, they are not allowed to put sides up on beds. Mom has a concave mattress and mats on the floor.
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Hi, baby monitor, is great along with tha bed alarm pad and chair. It has help us a whole lot these past weeks. Hope it helps.
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We had the same issue with my mom in AL with 24/7 aides. In the end, it was clear that she needed NH care at that point. She hasn't fallen since she was admitted there.
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Huge sympathy. I pray for someone to invent an alarm that will tell me that my mother is about to get up, rather than that she has just done so. The temptation to strap her down…

Does it help to know why she's doing it? Not sure it does help, really, unless it points to some way of preventing it. It could be she's not comfortable in her lying/ sitting position, and her brain creates some reason why she needs to get up - that's the only thing I can think of that might be worth having a look at, since everything else seems to be covered.

In the end, if it happens, it happens. Once you've done all you can you're left with accepting whatever risk still remains. Sorry, I know how nerve-racking it is.
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Best wishes to all- it is a very difficult time to all family members. Nursing homes are needed but I wouldn't wish them on anyone. My father spent almost 3 years there (he was almost 96) before he passed (dementia/alz). He kept insisting he could walk (just help me stand) but he hadn't stood in close to 3 years.
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As you mention full blown dementia I wonder is she falling out of bed and chair or getting out? My mother, who hasn't walked in 9 months and never will, is obsessed with the idea that if she can walk she can buy another house, new furniture and have live in servants so she keeps climbing out of bed and her wheelchair and of course ends up on the floor. Weak and very frail it's amazing how much strength determination gives them.
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I sympathize with your situation. I went through this with my Dad. The nursing facility tucked a bolster next to him on the bed which made it difficult for him to get up or accidentally roll out of bed. The bed was lowered, the mat was placed on the floor too. While in a chair, he had the alarm that was inconspicuously clipped to his shirt that would only give him about a foot of forward motion before it set off. Since he had a hip replacement too, he wasn't able to lean forward very far. Since restraint is not allowed, the nurses attached a table on his chair to play cards, hold his beverage etc. It also prevented him from trying to stand up. He suffered with sun-downers so the nurses and aids kept him close around that time of day.
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The NH calls me for every little thing. After a lifetime of stress I had a mini stroke. Now I take the phone off the hook around 5 p.m. Great staff at the NH 24/7 and a hospital 4km away. I live on a dirt road, pitch black, currently surrounded by snow and ice and I have physical issues, whatever can wait until tomorrow.
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Thanks for all the great tips! Hospice got my mom a lower bed and a pad for the floor. So far, so good! I'm almost afraid to say it, but I haven't been called in a week!
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I use a baby monitor with my Grandfather. I carry my end everywhere I go thru the house. We also use bed and chair alarms. I guess my Grandpa is not the only "sneaky ninja" out there. ;) Good luck.
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