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Where is the OP?
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Reply to NeedHelpWithMom
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No offense, ajjrcair,

Please fill in the gaps.
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Isthisreallyreal,

Oh, how true! We can dream or fantasize anyway! Can you imagine nurses with blow darts or stun guns? Geeez! In exreme cases...just saying. You and I better shut up or we will be in trouble!!! Haha
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I think that might be a little unethical. I'm a caregiver by profession, and have the pleasure of handling some of our high needs clients. I have been hit, kicked, spat it, scratched, clawed, had my hair pulled, walkers thrown at me, the lot. Most of this occurred while working as a private caregiver in a nursing home for a memory care.It sucks sometimes and is hard, but we are trained how to handle it and it takes a lot of pressure off of care staff. It might be something to look into. It would be considered non-skilled home health.
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Countrymouse Mar 8, 2019
"Non-skilled" - !

I'm sure you're correct, I'm not arguing. Just, isn't that ridiculous?
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The thing is, the elder needs to be evaluated by a psychiatric/behavioral specialist/ team. At that point, appropriate meds can be trialed.
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NeedHelpWithMom Mar 8, 2019
Yep, Barb.

Place it all in the right hands. So true.
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I think the poster just wasn't sure of the word to use.

First, if this is something new, she should be checked for a UTI. I found that the NH usually suggests something that may calm her. You can ask the Director of Nursing if something can be given.
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I thought this was just standard procedure in NHs. I've seen a lot of people pretty zombied out in NH.
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cwillie Mar 7, 2019
At one time I would have agreed with you but now I know that a lot of the zombie effect is due to a person's health, not their medications... sadly it's just the way they are.
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How, nasty?
Any idea why?
Has the NH suggested this?
What else has been tried to cope with your mother's challenging behaviour?
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Just knocking somebody out with a tranq would be using a chemical restraint and is not acceptable except for short term emergency situations - ask for a care plan meeting, it will take the whole team to analyze her behaviour and offer solutions, which may indeed include medications.
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I don’t know how that works. I suppose others have knowledge about this type of situation.

What exactly do you mean by tranquilizer? Something to completely knock her out? Guess I am envisioning an animal being tranquilized on a PBS documentary or something. Or are you referring to a mild sedative? Give more details.

How is she behaving with the nurses? Does she have valid complaints? Inquire/investigate further if you don’t know all the details.
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Isthisrealyreal Mar 8, 2019
I wish we could do that PBS animal thing sometimes. Some days it feels like a very viable solution 😏
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