Mom is in a SNF pending Medicaid approval. She still receives a bill for her prescription plan, so I am able to see the medication they are giving her? Can I request changes?

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Also her mood and behavior have changed a lot in the past few weeks. The drug that concerns me the most is the simvastatin. At home I gave her very high dose omega 3 fish oil. And this kept her cholesterol down. My question is, can I tell the facility/doctor that I do not want her on the "statin" and substitute it with pharmaceutical grade fish oil? (Sometimes called esters Or omega 3, legally, as her daughter do I have the right to tell them to take her off that medication? I am mom's medical proxy. Her bill for medication for 4 weeks is $150.00. At home it was $50 for blood pressure meds. They also have her on high dose very strong anti-depressant (mirtazapine) if it works I don't have any issue with her taking it.

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And please stay on top of that med list you ask for! My MIL was prescribed a drug we agreed with,,, never received even though for 3 months of caremeetings we saw it on the list, and questioned if she was getting it. Always some excuse, even though Dr ordered it ( opps, not sent in, opps we missed that) At the last care meeting they said " well shes diabetic",,, nope! Well, she has ALZ".. nope! Family finally asked if they had the correct chart....
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You can advocate for your mother, but you should follow the doctor's protocol of care. The physician should be aware that you're giving your LO OTC meds.
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You can advocate for your mother, but you should follow the doctor's protocol of care.
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My LO gets an EOB from her supplemental prescription provider about once a month. I always review it to be informed of meds and any change. I would highly encourage it. I was shocked to see a med started that I had not even heard about. Anyway, a meeting with the doctor cleared it up, once he understood Palliative care is what we wanted. The statins and a few others meds were discontinued and others reduced.
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Why is she receiving a bill for her RX plan?
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I haven't heard anyone say you can get them to give patient the fish oil. Do I understand correctly that without that, the statin might be necessary? So the question is getting a facility to give a "vitamin" as if it were medicine, which in this story, it is. Good question.
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I agree with Igloo; medications are doctor orders and the doctor has the last word. I am thinking that it’s absolutely reasonable for CG or the patient to approach the doctor with your concerns. I don’t think he wouldn’t take your request in mind either. Some docs like patient/CG to take an more active role in their loved one’s care.
And we really don’t know what her lipid labs are- they could be sky high.
Speaking with the doctor would be my first step.
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So are you saying that she is currently on Medicare, of course, but does not have part D?
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JanetM is exactly right concerning discussions about meds. MD's ARE touchy about someone questioning prescribed meds. When I ask my parents' docs about meds, I approach with a questioning & curious demeanor. I find also that they ARE receptive when one mentions the increased cost of new meds & "I was wondering if there might be something more affordable..." Another approach is to speak to the MD's nurse, again with a deferential approach, & just mention that she did well on _____ med. & you are wondering if _____ med could be considered. Yes it is a game but you will "catch more flies" that way.
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Since you have the power of medical proxy, yes, you can request changes. Be sure, however, to couch your concerns in terms of wanting to discuss, vs. wanting to instruct. Doctors have brittle egos and do not always take kindly to family members pointing out medication problems.

For information on drugs and drug interactions, you can consult ehealthme.com, WebMD, Drugs.com and the NIH drug information library. To find out about medication either recommended for the elderly or not recommended, download a copy of the BEERS list from the American Geriatric Association. My mother's doctor did not appreciate my research, but staff at patient care meetings helped to broach my requests in nonthreatening terms.
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