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I have put cameras up there and tried to convince her nobody was their now they are hurting her when she is trying to sleep. She says they are shooting something at her head and it gives her head aches this all started when she lived in Florida and neighbor hood kids would scare the elderly she moved back home and she still hears them and sees them she is very sane and takes good care of herself what should I do?

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If it is dementia, there's probably little that will convince her that this isn't real. My mom was convinced the people on the news on TV were talking only to her, and that they were sending signals to her from Boston via New York to do it. We live in LA. None of it made any sense at all and there was no convincing her otherwise. Lots of other similar anecdotes over the years. What they see, hear, smell, and feel may or may not have any connection with the world around them.
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This can be part of the dementia even early dementia. My mom imagined similar and could see a porch light with a red bulb at a neighbors across the street. The tree would blow such that it would appear the light was flashing. She imagined that neighbor kid had a laser on her night and was going to shoot her so she moved from bedroom to LR to sleep at night to "get away from laser". Another time she constantly was calling A/C service guy because there was singing coming from the vents...they couldn't find anything. I found that it was the fan kicking on and had a little hum, but with her losing her hearing suppose it sounded melodically to her in a quiet house.
She would repeat these concerns at every visit and every phone call..and it went on for awhile, but eventually she moved on to other topics and let go of it.
Try to distract her or provide good lighting at night for her. Perhaps install a lock on the attack and give her a key and reassure her no one can hide up there anymore. Or you might try a white lie and say another elder in the town reported same thing last week and the police caught the kids and locked them up...so now you're safe mom.
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Yes, tell the Dr. about the kids and any other observations that you have. She may well try to come across for the doctor as healthier than she really is. That is not unusual.

It also sounds like you are going to need someone other than your son to look after her. I believe she is going to need more supervision that someone in college can give.
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Andy, there are some very good articles right here on this website.... click on the link below and scroll down.

https://www.agingcare.com/Alzheimers-Dementia
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Thank you
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And I will have to tell the Dr. about the kids
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yes she seen the doctor for here head aches had a ct scan and everything was ok I will ask for a MRI
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Please get mom to the doctor and have an assessment made as soon as you can. She may seem very "sane" in other ways, and this may be the only manifestation she will exhibit for a while, if this is dementia. Or this could be something else, especially since she complains of headaches. I'd ask for an MRI or CT to check for injury, stroke or perhaps a tumor. You won't know until an assessment is done.
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Do you know what kind of dementia she has? There are videos online by Teepa Snow that are very enlightening.
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she has her grand son who is in college living with her I have been reading on dementia is there a good book on this kind of dimentia
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Andy, you need to do some reading about dementia. Mom's brain is broken. She no longer can reason, so trying rational ways of convincing her won't work.

Who lives with her? Is this a new symptom? Have you talked to her doc about it? It could be a uti, or a deepening of her dementia.
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