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He wants me to get an absent ballot for her. Please give me directions on how to handle this.

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I would choose my battles on this one. Request the ballot, if mom understands even party differences and express her desire, then fill it out for her. Since this is causing issues for dad, do it, if mom not capable of making the decisions do not return the ballot.
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Yes, we had to think long and hard about this one, too. I agree with CW that if you are going to go ahead and get your mother a ballot paper, then you must stay hands-off - if your mother isn't able to understand the process, understand who she's voting for and handle the thing herself, then doing it for her is totally out of order. And, actually, probably illegal?
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Oh please, does anyone really think a bed bound woman with late stage alzheimers is qualified to vote? It may be her right, but it is your responsibility to ensure she has the capacity to mark her ballot independently and without coaching from the sidelines. If she is capable of that then go for it, but if not then in reality you or your dad are casting two ballots.
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In our area, we get the absentee ballots from our local community - city, township, etc. Contact the clerk's office and ask how to get your parents on the list. You'll be asked some questions, i.e., age, mobility....for you the issue would be that your parent(s) is/are unable to get to the polls, or are over 65, or perhaps other issues.

It's not anything you have to qualify for other than meeting the age and mobility requirements.

Generally, at least in my area of Michigan, the request for the ballot is sent out at least a month before the election, with checkoffs to be selected as to the specific reason why an absentee ballot is necessary. Complete and return those forms (for each of your parents), then the absentee ballot is sent with the list of all the candidates and proposals.

You can complete for your mother if you also certify on the ballet that you're doing so on her behalf. I help my father, and acknowledge that by also signing in the section provided. That's legal and acceptable.

Your father is a good man to want your mother to still vote; it's comforting to know that he feels that responsibility, AND that right.

In our last local city election, less than 40% of the voters voted, and it was an important one locally for us. That level of participation is really pathetic.
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Pam is right, it is too late now. What comes up next are the primaries for party elections for President which won't be until sometime next year. You can get the ballot, your Dad can fill out his. As for your Mom, if you know 100% for sure who she would vote for you can fill that box... and have her sign the ballot, and you as the witness.

If Mom is unable to communicate or doesn't understand who is running for the primary, just go through the motions to make Dad happy.... then tell Dad you will drop off the ballots at the post office [except for Mom's].
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Too late for the November 2015 elections, sorry. They would both qualify, so contact your county board of elections and ask for an absentee ballot for them and for yourself if you are a full time caregiver and cannot get to the polls. That way they will get ballots for future primaries and general elections.
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