My mom (88) has dementia and no longer recognizes me or cannot understand anything being said. Is this normal?

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She is in late moderate to early advanced stage. She fell in bathroom, at her Memory Care facility. Surgery to repair broken hip, with screws, is scheduled for noon today. She was able to talk, did not always make sense, and follow orders. Since entering hospital, she has been asleep or out of it the whole time. She is in a lot of pain, when they try to move her, to clean her up or change sheets.

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Pain meds really knock them for a loop. So does anesthesia; dementia can take a giant leap forward. My thoughts and prayers are with you.
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I think the most important thing right now is for you to show up every day when they transfer her to rehab. I'm not saying they'll do a bad job if you don't, but from my experience and personal observations, the workers there are nicer and more attentive if they see you visit everyday.
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I agree with Cwillie; my mom broke her hip at 90, after a stroke and vascular dementia had set it. She was totally out of it in the hospital but once settled in the rehab unit of a nursing home, got stronger and learned to walk with a walker.

Ask about the anesthesia they will be using. In my mom's case, they were able to do the kind of repair you're talking about using a local and heavy sedation, rather than general anesthesia, which can be very hard on the brain.

Sending good thoughts your way!!!!
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The hospital is traumatic and the pain and medication for the pain will add to her confusion. They have a lot of success today repairing hips in frail elders, it isn't the death sentence it used to be. Just take it one day at a time.
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