My mom has arthritis bone on bone in her knees. Is this causing her not to walk?

Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
4

Answers

Show:
Bone on bone arthritis would cause me not to want to walk any more than absolutely necessary!

Being in a wheelchair can be very reassuring for people who have fallen a lot. At least they don't have to worry about the fall risk. If you mother is considering knee replacement, does that mean she is hoping to walk again? Is that realistic (per doctors)? Or is she just looking for pain relief? Are there less invasive pain-relief methods that could be tried?

Heart surgery has a different impact on most people than other kinds of surgery. My best friend's husband was not the same person after his bypass operation. All the doctors tried to talk him into taking an antidepressant. After about a year he was in hospital for something else, and they simply added an antidepressant. My friend says it was like getting her husband back! What kinds of medications is your mother on? Has the post-surgery change been addressed medically?

Strokes can produce damage in the brain. Has your mother been evaluated for dementia?

How can you help her? I suggest two things: 1) Continue to be her advocate. If she is in pain, consider taking her to a pain clinic or specialist. Ask questions about any medical procedures being considered. See that she is getting good care. 2) Focus on making the most of your time together right now. Don't wait until she gets back to her old self -- that may never happen. Take her for walks about the neighborhood (in her wheelchair). Look at photo albums with her. Play cards or board games. Include friends she has made in the ALF. Participate in activities. When you are with her, don't focus solely on what is wrong with her ... but take advantage of what she still can do.

In the ALF where my daughter works they try to take all the residents who want to go to a nearby location where they can see the local 4th of July parade. There aren't enough staff people to provide one-on-one help, and family members are encouraged to come to walk with or wheel their loved ones. My daughter has the day off, but she is going in for the parade period to help someone who has no nearby family. This is the kind of thing I am thinking of when I say make the most of what is available to your mother, just as she is.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My dad has the same -- arthritis with bone on bone in his knee. Along with his advanced Parkinson's, he too is in a wheelchair. I try to walk him around his memory care unit a few times a week. He seems to like just getting up and moving enough to tolerate the pain, but we don't walk very far.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

She is thinking of having knee replacement surgery. I'm terrified that she won't do the PT after and she'll get worse. She had 7 hours of open heart and bypass surgery a year ago and hasn't been the same since. She's in a wheelchair bc she can't walk. Sits in a lazy boy chair all day. Not really sure how to help her anymore. Feel very lost..
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Yes, could be. It can become very painful, bone on bone.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.