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Mom is currently living in a retirement community in their independant care section. She leases her apartment, When she moved in she couldn't afford to buy into the Life Care program which would afford medical care etc.... until she dies. As an option we took her money from the sale of her home and invested it into annuities that would at least assure montly payment to assist her with her rent. This has worked out well up until this time. Now, Mom is requiring assistance and we are looking at moving her into a assisted living or personal care facility but are finding this to be much to expensive for her budget. It was during a conversation with an elder care attorney that he brought up the idea of a Medicaid waiver. The big question at this point is, does the annuity count as income. I appreciate any light you can shed on this matter . Thanks in advance.

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It might be possible for her to stay in her residence with some help. Can she pay for someone to stay with her a few hours a day, several days a week? We did that for my mom (round the clock) for almost two years.We didn't have professional care givers, but myself, husband, s-i-l, and two friends. She paid the friends, and it went well for quite a long time until she needed an nh. Best wishes for you & your mom.
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Any income is accountable whether it is Soc Sec, Retirement, IRA's, Annuities, Stock dividends, etc. If she makes over $2000.00 a month, forget about medicaid. You better go back to that elder care attorney. They should have known that.
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I thought Medicaid Waivers were those receiving home and community based services. Is that the plan for her care? Each state has their own determination on financial eligibility and what is countable income. I would go beyond the conversation with the Elder Attorney and hire that person for further advice.
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Didn't the elder care attorney have any answers for you? He/she should know the laws better than we and Medicaid would know better than he/she. Perhaps you could hire someone to care for your mother in her apt.
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She will have to qualify for Medicaid both financially (most states have this at 2K in non-exempt assets and 2K in monthly income but it varies by state) and medically (requires skilled nursing care). The attorney should be able to evaluate her situation for financials in your state and the specific ceiling for income once you give him mom's data.

I would be somewhat concerned on her medical screening because if they have been in their home or in IL they may not have in their medical file the history to show needing a higher level of care of a NH or AL. For NH, they have to need skilled nursing services. Realize that if she is viewed as OK for AL, then she may not qualify for Medicaid as most states have Medicaid for long term stay geared to NH. Now some states do have a Medicaid waiver or diversion program for AL but those AL beds seem to be limited. You will have to make sure that the AL participates in a waiver program and will accept mom into it from the get-go. What happens often is that AL facilities will fill their participating waiver beds for residents who either are there for months or years in advance and on private pay and are already on the list for the next available waiver bed. So although your mom's name is on the list, there are a dz ahead of her on the list who are residents. You need to speak frankly with admissions on this and your ability or inability to private pay.
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are you saying to do this for an accurate account of her income ?
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Yes they will ask about CD's and annuities, which count as income. Start by pulling the last 5 years tax returns to get an idea.
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