Mom (93) is living in a Memory care center and has had 3 falls in a month. What can be done to decrease this?

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She like to wander.Two of her falls resulted in bumps to her head. One occurred when a care giver was at the breakfast table when she was arising. She somehow got tangled in a leg or something and went down getting a big bang on her noggin. Fortunately not a serious bump, though. The next time she got up in the middle of the night and put her shoes on and I guess then fell. She was found on the hourly bed check on the floor but no bumps or bruises were present. Sunday she wandered into bathroom on her own and was found on the floor she did have another bump on her head. She hasn't toileted her self in a long time so I imagine she just wandered into the space and wasn't looking to go the bathroom. The center said they are trying to keep her in a wheelchair but they do sit her in comfy chairs and she is at times capable of getting up and walking with the wheel chair as a walker. They say she gets restless and likes to wander but has been becoming more unstable on her feet. she isn't on a lot of meds and they have been ruled out as a reason for her falls as has a urinary infection. What can be done to prevent these falls before she seriously hurt herself? I know she thinks she is capable of getting around and just forgets she can't do it on her own. What have others done to help with this issue? What is the ratio of enough patient supervision to care-givers..

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Well, that is a tough one. My Mom hasn't been doing that on her own for a year now so not a problem. And I think she now feels more freedom as walking was at a very slow snail's pace. She can move the wheelchair faster and easier. She is sort of like a kid with a new kiddie car now when she starts moving around the center a big smile gets plastered on her face.
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You know, it's kind of a Catch 22. You want your loved one to stay on their feet and walk for as long as they can, and not be artificially confined to the bed or chair - yet there comes a time when they really are unsteady and need to be confined. I don't know that there a perfect answer to a problem like this. How do you convince someone who has dementia so bad that they don't even know they have it - that they shouldn't get up to go to the bathroom? .
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Since those falls there have been no others. She is now in a wheelchair full tim amd i dpnt thi k she can get up wothout assistance. On the plus side she really seems to enjoy moving thr chair with her feet and hss become more active.
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Oh what a dilemma. I will ask the Heavenly Angels to watch over you mom, and all the elderly. It is a very tough problem, not enough aides to be close enough, all the time. So it is inevitable, many many elderly will surely fall, and repeatedly. Society has to realize there is a good range of acceptable fall prevention. There is literally NO one place and NO aide quick enough and NO device that can prevent, or alert, ALL falls.
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Kwriter, the chair pressure pad sits under the seat cushion and go off when she rises from the chair, or makes a serious effort to anyway. She wouldn't even know it was there. But from your description, she could be sitting almost anywhere, couldn't she, and they couldn't put alarms on every chair in the place.

I love the sound of the unit, it sounds like a first rate place. However. Not great from a falls prevention point of view, especially with a person who is restless but can't walk around safely. Very, very tricky. What do the staff suggest? After all, it's their job to keep your mother from harm.
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My mother's nursing home claims they cannot use any restraints, and that includes many things that don't seem like restraints to me at all. They understand that my mother forgets she can't walk so they go to devious lengths to restrain her without using forbidden devices.

There are some sensible things that can be done to help prevent falls. But it is impossible to eliminate the risk entirely. One of Mom's falls occurred with an aide in the room within two feet of her. My husband fell often, even when I was walking with him. The best I could do was break his fall, but not stop it from happening.

Work with the staff to brainstorm ideas in how to reduce risks for your loved one. But also accept that falls are not 100% preventable.
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Mom is in what would be considered an assisted living place for dementia patients only. A call button would be useless since she'd never remember to use it. They have maximum of 16 patients per side and the residents can go freely from one side to the other through the kitchen areas. They are really only required to be on their side at bedtime and they do try to keep them on the side they belong on for meals though they won't argue with them if they want to eat on the wrong side. There are another 16 on that side too so a total of 32 if all are there. They also do take day-care patients and that number fluctuates. from day to day. Plus there are always a lot of visitors coming and going. They have 4 full time staff on each side plus a full time RN for the 2 sides and some others there part-time.

Usually they use one side for activities etc. and let the sleepers of which there are a lot. Many of the residents snooze most of the day away. The acitivities seem to move by which side seems the most sleepy. Those awake are encouraged to try the activities. Mom often doesn't like doing them much though nor does she like sitting with the sleepers but prefers to wander off. I think she prefers being where it is quieter and away from all the people thus she goes down the hallway which is quiet but still has atmosphere with nice furniture and décor. She has a bedroom of her own that she shares with another lady. She really is only in there to sleep, and can't find it on her own anyway. I don't think she can open the door and negotiate her way in anyway.
She really can't get up on her own from the recliners and sofas but can muster up the strength sometimes from the wheelchair. She gets bored being on the couch etc. She likes to move and can use her legs to move the wheelchair around. An alarm on the chair might work but she really likes to pick things off and I know that was a problem with my FIL we couldn't find an alarm he couldn't disarm.
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hi all, my father had 3 falls in 4 days last August. the last one he fractured his hip and ended up in ICU for a week. He has been recovering in a skilled rehab facility. There is talk of him coming home and he is much more like my dad again. But quite frankly, I'm afraid this is going to happen all over again. I would be interested in those who use bed or other types of alarms. His facility is also restraint free. What helped in the beginning is pushing the bedside table by the bed on one side and a chair on the othe side. they also lower the bed to the lowest level available. there is also a body pillow available. but one of the stnas told me that is also considered a restraint. I did not get that but would love input from those who have any alarms.
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I just remembered that my brother in law printed a huge color picture of himself with a very large lobster ( he's a scuba diver) and taped it to my mother in law s cabinet in the nh where she could see it. It said something like, "if you try to get up, I'll throw you in the pot with this lobster". She would see it, it would make her laugh and she'd remember she should use the button.
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That's weird: how does an alarm restrict anyone? I suspect that DON wants a firm talking to - Health and Safety type authorities get fed to the back teeth with people misinterpreting guidelines, and it can get difficult to believe they're not being intentionally thick. Or at least disingenuous, when their actual problem is they don't want the hassle.
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