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My mother was forced to retire due to early-onset Alzheimer's about three years ago. She went on SSA retirement income and is now 67 years old.


Could she have gotten SSDI as well, and is there anything we can do now retroactively?


They are currently living with me largely because they lost so much income from her having to quit working.

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My hubby was on SSI disability and at full retirement age it automatically changed to plain Social security.
There are other low income benefits your Mom may be eledgeable for so it is worth a visit to social security or you local office on aging. They have very knowledgeable social workers.
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You can't "double dip," e.g. receive both SS retirement income and SSI disability income. Agree with others here. Retain an attorney.
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Hi all, I went to Social Security with her and confirmed that because she became disabled and retired at just over age 65, there was no option to collect SSDI because she was full retirement age.
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Swingswing, I think there are good suggestions above about seeking legal advice to see what can be done, but, I would also consider this. Is mom in need of Medicaid for long term care? If so, her monthly income will be considered for her eligibility. If her income is too high, it could disqualify her for Medicaid benefits, so, I take that into consideration when you speak with the attorney.
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It doesn't switch types of SS at age 65- it switches when you reach by your full retirement age, which could be later, depending on your birth year.
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If your Mom is low income, she may still qualify for SSI (supplemental security income) in addition to SS.

Pamstegma knows more about this, what I have written is what I have heard, and may not apply in your case.
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Nolo says this:
"Alzheimer's Disease
Social Security has specific criteria for when Alzheimer's qualifies for disability, but an early-onset diagnosis gets fast-tracked."
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In general, one of the definitions of 'disability' is that you are no longer able to do the work you were trained or qualified for, and that you will not be able to earn a living wage.
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If someone has SSDI before 65, once you turn 65 it is just called retirement, and the income is the same. So I don't think after 65 one can receive SSDI benefits.

An attorney is limited by Soc. Sec. in how much they can receive for a case, or at least in how much is withheld from your benefits to pay the attorney if you are approved for SSDI. The case takes awhile, so benefits would also accrue retroactively.

'Retroactively': If you applied for SSDI, and were denied, then hired an attorney and were approved, your benefits would accrue retroactively to the time you filed.

I do not know if you can file now, at age 67.

A consultation with an attorney's office specializing in SS disability may be free, it would not hurt to ask a question.

If your Mom retired early the benefit would be lower than if she retired after 65.
That difference is maybe what you should ask about. So, ask a lawyer, get a free consultation.
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No you get SSDI for disability before retirement age. You apply for retirement any time after you turn 62. She has that. You do not get both.
Having Alzheimer's does not get SSDI in it's early stages.
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Please consult an attorney that specializes in social security disability. It might be possible to file retroactively, but you would lose a portion of the recovered benefits to the attorney. This is not a do-it-yourself project. However the re-filing might result in larger benefits going forward. Social security may, if they determine that disability existed before early retirement, adjust benefits retroactively but this is not something we can give you step by step directions for on this board. I think it is worth at least a consult.
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Swingwing, I am moving your post back to the beginning to see if there is anyone who is familiar with this, that can answer.
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