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-no pain either

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SueC, Worried12 asked her question several hours ago. Answering that is perfectly appropriate. It is a good idea on older posts to scroll down and see if there is a recent post to respond to.
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LOL 😝
I didn't realize "elised" wrote this 7 months ago!
Hope her mom turned out ok.
Next time I'll check the date the post was written.
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Especially if she's on a blood thinner, she needs to go to the ER.
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Worried12,
Your mom was caring for your brother and now your brother cares for your mother? I don't understand.

It sounds as if they both need an outside professional caregiver. Any way to checkout caregiving agencies and hire one for both of them?

The situation doesn't sound safe. Could you stay at night until other arrangements can be made?
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Yes, take her in. They may want to do a scan to "rule out" inter cranial hemorrhage (see if she has bleeding in or around the brain). Better safe than sorry. Go immediately if she's on blood thinners.

I am amazed that both memory care centers never did anything when my mother hit her head but took her for an X-Ray and alerted me when she broke her wrist.
I guess they figure the skull is hard!(?)
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My 87 year old Mother fell at home, my 62 year old brother picked her up and told her to go to bed, he too went to bed for the evening. I found out about this the following morning when visited and saw the bruising on her forehead. I am very worried that my brother has many problems and does not have the capacity to care for my Mother. Mother until approx 2 years ago was her son's informal carer. I visit as often as a can and feel I need to report this and the suspected financial abuse. Any thoughts?
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I would take him but if he needs to stay in the hospital make sure that they admit him - otherwise it will be just for observation and you will have a huge bill.
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I would take her to the ER and have her checked out. My 94 year old father fell backwards and hit the top of his head. I took my dad to the ER and everything checked out fine. Three weeks later he had a hard time speaking and was not making any sense. I forced him to go to the ER where they found a subdural hematoma. He was taking warfarin and that caused a bleed in his head. I wished the doctors would have told me that there is a chance of a hematoma while being on warfarin. The hematoma severely impacted his life.
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Elised, I would take her in just to be safe. Falls can also indicate other issues may be occurring. Any time there is a trauma, swelling can cause issues as well.
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elised, oh that reminds me of the time that my Dad [94] fell backwards on his driveway.... I didn't learn about this until a few hours later so I rush to my parents house. Dad had a goose egg sized bump, so I wanted to take him to urgent care but he was too wobbly to even stand... oops.

I called 911 and he went to the ER, they ran a battery of test, and kept him overnight for observation. Everything checked out good :)

Prior my Mom [98] thought an ice bag and a good lunch would do the trick. Oh dear, what if this was something serious. At one time Dad was on blood thinners, thank goodness he wasn't on those at this time.
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Yeah, I would take her to be on the safe side. The actress Natasha Richardson had a bump on the head from skiing and died a few hours later from a brain bleed. You never know.
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I would, just to be safe. My mother was notorious for saying she wasn't in pain, etc - but there were obvious problems. If you're concerned, take her in and have her evaluated. It's better to be proactive than reactive in these situations. Elderly folks can sometimes have symptoms 2 days or more after a fall that don't show up right away, especially if they are normally not very active - they might seem fine at first, but then get up to walk or transfer and realize that they have pain in their hip or leg that could indicate an injury. Sometimes the shock of a fall (especially a bad one) can make them focus more on the fact that they fell, and not realize they are hurting.
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