My Mom was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's and Dr cannot get her meds right. Any advice? - AgingCare.com

My Mom was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's and Dr cannot get her meds right. Any advice?

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Hi my name is rosa I'm new here. My family and I have known something was wrong 7 years ago started very slow n progressed very fast ..I would say she's at a stage 6 going on 7 on the dementia chart . For the past year it has been the worst non stop crying all day long she pulls at anyone that is around her to go with her out but even when she is out she's never happy and very depressed this is everyday all day long n the nights are not much better she doesn't sleep tosses n turns fix this fix that let's go she seems to never tire out !!! We have been working with her neurologist for the past year with different Meds and still no improvements .. i keep explaining to the doctor that we need a better approach to get her Meds right n it's always the same thing it takes time ... Well it's been a year playing with the same Meds up n down n nothing so whats next . I feel bad she should not have to live like this there are plenty of Meds out there . I know I'm never getting rid of the disease but I do want the depression ,anxiety And the crying to go away its just not right .... she has been to the er 3 times this year for anxiety and panic attacks. She also has stayed for 4 days in a state home for med adjustments ...it worked for a bit and now it's worse then ever . I'm very worried for her ! My mom has all the support n means to take care of her at home but without the help of the dr it's becoming impossible .. It's taken a toll on my dad n three siblings we don't know what else to do . I've called so my hospitals to see if they had a bed for impatient stay for another med adjust n have been turned down left n right no one seems to except NPH insurance I need a unit for Alzheimer's or dementia . Has anyone gone through the same issue or have a parent who has the same disease as my mom please help I don't know what else to do or where to go !!! Thanks in advance

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Was she actually diagnosed with Alzheimer's?

Something is really bothering her... my mom was diagnosed with Alzheimer's 5 years ago and she has not once cried... not even when my dad passed away.

So sorry you and mom have to go through this. To me, it sounds like it is something more than Alzheimer's going on.
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At stage seven she should be eligible for Hospice care. She will get much better medications and be fully covered by Medicare. It removes a tremendous financial burden and the patient benefits from the availability of drugs that most doctors are afraid to write prescriptions for. Call Hospice.
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