My Mom is driving us nuts since we had to take her dog away. Any suggestions?

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She has dementia and lives in an assisted living community. dog was removed because mom refused to walk her on a leash(even before her dementia, she refused to walk dog on leash), and the dog off lead is a liability for the assisted living community(also some people are afraid of dogs). She was told,(not my choice, other family members), that Dolly had to go away because mom was not walking her on lead, but of course, mom says she did walk Dolly on lead, says everyone is lying, says we stole her dog, and she wants her baby back. There were signs all over her apt, saying put leash on dog,and nurses cuing her, but nothing worked. We even paid to have someone walk the dog with mom, but then mom refused to go with them. Poor little dog was suffering as well since only my mom or her long time private aide could get the dog to go out, but aide only there 4 hrs a day, and mom took dog out when she felt like it. Mom will not let go of asking for the dog and has been yelling and cursing at us. She was calling us 50 times a dy, non-stop which was frustrating and upsetting, and very bad for my brother who has MS. We finally told the Assisted living nurses to unplug her phone. I know that sounds cruel, but we hd no choice. We live in VA, mom lives in Florida and does not want to move north and leave her aide, Candy. Candy, btw, takes mom out every day to shop and eat out, and also plays cards with her, etc. but nothing distracts mom from wanting her dog back. I have one memory care facility in mom's area that will let her have her dog off lead(very pet friendly). Problem is, we're not sure mom is ready for memory care as she still knows who we are, who Pres. is, etc. and we're worried that she will hate it at this place. But, at least she could have her dog! BTW, places here in VA either do not allow pets, or need them on lead and cared for by the resident. Also, rents at assisted living communities up here are very expensive compared to florida, and money unfortunately, is an issue. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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I now have an indelible picture in my head of a chihuahua herding cows, bounding over the pasture with the wind rippling her ears. Thank you, AmyGrace :D
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Bubbe1, sounds like you did the best thing for both of them. Sadly, aging takes so much away from us, including our beloved pets, but there is nothing we can do. Its so hard to explain to someone with dementia because they suffer loss often without the ability to understand it. You and you mother are so fortunate to have a wonderful caretaker - she sounds like an angel and she has given you peace of mind - she must be a lovely person!
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Bubbe1, you did the right thing in regard to the dog. Lot safer for the dog and for the community since your Mom refused to use a leash. Sounded like a win-win for all involved :)
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Countrymouse, thank you.
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AmyGrace, mom's dog is back wit her wonderful breeder, running and playing on a farm, with other dogs. As for mom moving here, she doesn't want to. She likes florida, where it's warm and sunny all year and she can go out and take walks whenever she want to. Here in the north, she would be miserable. As well, she loves her very long time aide, Candy who is irreplaceable.
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Seriously, as a dog lover, it would crush me to lose my dogs. You mom has dementia, and if she moves near you where she can have her dog, unless there is someone to care for it, eventually you will have to find it a new home but it may be worth it if she will move. Unfortunately, with dementia things are black and white to her - she wants her dog and trying to reason with her that she will have to move, just doesn't compute. It sounds like the dementia is fairly bad. Please be sure, whatever you do that you find a good forever home for the dog and don't give him/her to a shelter - check on line and find a group that will connect with someone who agrees to love and care for an older dog forever. If it is a pure breed, there are re-home sites for just about any breed.
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Bubbe, for what it's worth I'd have turned my phone off too. There's nothing wrong with taking control of when and where you take calls - a lot of people would escape a lot of fruitless agony if they took a leaf out of your book, there, with no harm done to the loved one.
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I have my mom's little dog. He was her everything and at first mom talked about the dog and wanting it. I took him for visits which just upset her to let him go. I bought her a stuff dog, we called it Coco 2. I put mom's name on it and said "I love you mom" on it's tag. Mom now talks to the stuff dog, gives it kisses and I believe she thinks it's real in some form. I am stuck with dog but glad mom is not talking about him anymore. I guess it all works out in the end.
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Thank you all for your answers. We ended up getting mom a cat who sits on her lap and sleeps with her. Mom loves her and has stopped asking for her dog. To those of you who said we were selfish and it was horrendous to take the dog away, she was not just an inconvenience. She was a danger to others who live in the assisted living community since mom would let Dolly run loose andsince she is tiny(a Chihuahua), people who do not see well, were tripping over her. As well, since mom didn't pick up after the dog, it was becoming a health issue. The dog absolutely would not walk with anyone else, we payed a dog walker for almost a year, but to no avail. Also she was grossly over feeding Dolly who could barely walk since she was so overweight. As for the phone, it's turned back on. So far,so good with that. Seems the cat is filling the void. BTW, the AL that my mom lives in is the most pet friendly of the AL's in the area. that's why we chose it. They really tried to make accomodations for Dolly, going so far as to have the head of assisted living go to mom's apt. and urge mom to go for a walk with the dog and dog walker, or at least get up and put the dog's leash on and walk to her front door, but mom wouldn't do it. For those who think we are awful, know that none of our decisions were made easily or without tears.
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Sounds like you weighed all the different and difficult factors, and made the best decision you could.
Take a break from your mother for a while until she adjusts. I had to stop contact with my mother for several months after removing her car, because she called me incessantly about it, and no amount of explaining did any good. She just had to move on, and I needed the irrational, circular, upsetting conversations to STOP. If you take yourself out of her sphere for a bit, it will help her to adjust.
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