My Mom has Alzheimer's and is living in a long-term facility. She doesn't understand that her disease causes her to live there. Any advice?

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Thanks for letting me know about that book; I'll try to find it!
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I just read "Talking to Alzheimer's: Simple Ways to Connect When You Visit with a Family Member or Friend" and the author covers several ways to respond to these kinds of things and still leave the person at peace about it. She does say it is hard at first for both the caregiver and the patient, but it gets better with time.
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Thanks, you're right, it is helpful to distract her. She's so happy to see family and most always in a good mood. I thank God that I still have my Mom with us, even if she isn't always 100%.
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Say, "the doctor says you need to stay here for a few more weeks until you get stronger. Let's look at this magazine I brought".
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When she asks me when she can go home, what should I say? I'm afraid she'll cry and get upset if I tell her she has to stay there forever, so is it more kind to just say, you are here under doctor's orders and this is the best place for you right now???
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Yeah, the trouble with Alzheimer's Disease and dementia is that we can't reason with our loved ones after a certain point. They just don't get it, Or....they get it at the time but forget it.

Tonight, in the past hour, I listened to mom start a conversation with, "I bought John a new pair of pants today," and go on to tell the story about them. Three separate times. (She's having more obvious sundowning now.) Each time she continued her story, I acted as if it was the first time I heard it. Why frustrate her is what I figure.

When mom was in the nursing home (in/out of hospital, too) for almost three months, every once in a while she'd want to go home. Sometimes, when I was getting ready to leave and said, "Bye, see ya' later," she'd say, "Maggie? If you go, who's going to take ME home?"

And each and every time I said practically the same thing. "Mom, this is your home for right now -- until you get stronger." That seemed to satisfy her each and every time. She never questioned it.

Maybe try that.
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Thinks she is just fine? Most patients do think they are just fine. So you watch over them and keep them safe.
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