Mom has dementia and lives in an assisted living facility. She has become less active, stays in her room more. Anything we can do to change this?

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Tinkering may not stimulate the brain, but neither does bingo. It is good that she still socializes. She used to color when she was in her room alone. Do you have any idea why she has stopped this? That can't have anything to do with the one lady she dislikes, can it, or about what her friend does?

Dose she seem content? Agitated? Depressed? Sad? If she is in good spirits, I'm not sure increasing her activity level is necessary/appropriate. If she is sad or frightened or having other issues try to think about how to solve those issues and she may want to increase activities on her own.

Dementia progresses. It gets worse. You can't count on her being the same as she was 6 months ago, and she'll be different 6 months from now. I think the most important thing is if she seems comfortable and content.
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Reply to jeannegibbs
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See sees several doctors on a regular basis. Her vitals are good. We know the reason for why she stopped the bus trips. She doesn't care for one of the ladies who goes to everything. According to her, the daily activities at her facilty are boring and she hates bingo. She attached herself to one lady and it's all about her. Her friend doesn't do the activities so maybe this could be the reason. It's a shame. I know the staff will try to get her involved but they can't force her. She sits in her room and tinkers. Tinkering doesn't stimulates the brain.
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Reply to Tryingourbest
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Well it’s good that she still wants to have lunch with the ladies.
I think I would just check her blood work, her vitals and her weight. Does she take an antidepressant or seemed depressed? Did she recently become incontinent? Have you checked her feet, toenails? Does she seem to wince or show signs of pain when you check her over? Any medication changes? Constipation? Did she have a problem with any of the others during an activity?
Perhaps a round of PT would get her going again. Would her doctor order it for her?
She sounds very sweet. Since she used to be very active I would be a little concerned too. 
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Reply to 97yroldmom
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The problem with Mom is that she did all of the activities, crafts, religious services and bus trips when she first moved in. She also colored (color pencil/adult coloring books) in her room and very much enjoyed this hobby. She was actually very talented with her choice of colors. She stopped doing all of this.. She does however enjoy her meal time to mingle with the residents. That's her social time.
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Reply to Tryingourbest
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The problem with Mom is that she did all of the activities, crafts, religious services and bus trips when she first moved in. She also colored (color pencil/adult coloring books) in her room and very much enjoyed this hobby. She was actually very talented with her choice of colors. She stopped doing all of this.. She does however enjoy her meal time to mingle with the residents. That's her social time.
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Reply to Tryingourbest
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Hearing issues can also be a deterrent to interaction with others. And sometimes the activities aren't that useful. When my mother was in rehab, I remember wondering to myself: How many beaded necklaces can someone make or even use when they're living in a facility? Are they going to wear these at home?

Activities can also require dexterity, which sometimes people lose not only b/c of age but b/c of arthritis and other issues.

I think that an activity which produces something for someone in need could be very appealing. It engages a basic need to help others.

And I still believe that music is transcendent and is perhaps the best activity ever.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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I don’t know if personality can change with dementia from extrovert to introvert but introverted people need lots of quiet time. And also, after my mom’s stroke she seems to have trouble on occasion articulating what she wants to say, so she gets quiet and either just listens to others talk or goes to her room for quiet time. Sometimes she speaks very clearly too so dementia is just mysterious in it’s symptoms.
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Reply to HolidayEnd
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I like both answers given. Try a little nudge but let her do what she wants.
Pick up the book “Being Mortal” by Atul Gawande.
It helps put things in perspective.
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Reply to 97yroldmom
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Your mom may be content to be by herself AL near me the majority of residents stay to themselves 
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Reply to shad250
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Maybe the activity around her is simply too stimulating for her mind.

I don't have dementia and when too much is going on around me, wow, I can feel, overwhelmed, anxious and aggrivated.

If she doesn't seem sad, I'd let her be. At least let her make this small choice for herself. So much has been taken away now mentally, physically, intellectually and emotionally that it may make you feel bad for her. Maybe it's only sad to us, she might be just fine alone.
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Reply to Pepsee
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