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I have to walk her everywhere with her walker and a gait belt. Just lately, she seems unable to move her feet to walk. She'll stand/stand/stand. Move an inch with one foot. I keep encouraging her; it's like her muscles don't work. I know she's had mild Parkinson's for a number of years.

This happens in the evening. In the morning and afternoon, she can walk . , . albeit at a snail's pace.

I'm afraid if I start using the wheelchair to get her everywhere, she'll get so she can't even stand and turn . . .

Anyone know why she might be doing this?

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GardenArtist no mention of spinal cancer. Docs werent sure why she was having these issues, chalked it up to chemo and rad effects after prescribing PD meds that she didn't think helped her. I was never close to the docs, I am out of her home state and I assumed my mom was giving them correct info and questioning them. They said she has vascular dementia probably due to chemo/rad. She is increasingly confused with slurred speech day to day. She was also on blood thinner falling daily and I wonder if she had a stroke last month. She is in hospice care now and I don't know if we can get her a brain scan while you're in hospice.
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Wisteach, has there been any advice by your mother's doctors that the cancer has metastasized to her spine? If she had brain rads, and now the cancer is lower in her body, I'm wondering about spinal cord compromise.

That happened to my sister; she had difficulty walking and controlling one of her feet, and was diagnosed with drop foot as a side effect of the cancer metastasis. She did get fitted with a foot device for walking assistance but it really didn't help much.
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This is how we found out my Mom had severe back problems! Her back never hurt, it was the nerves to her legs that were compressed. She kept saying, "My feet just won't move!" She also has evidence of LBD.
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My mom also uses the wheelchair now between every room. It's the only way bc she was leaning over forward on her walker and it would keep rolling if I weren't there to stop it. Her motor control is so minimal. Only my husband and son can transfer her as she is 50 lbs heavier and taller than me, I hope the wheelchair isn't making her worse.
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My mom was diagnosed w vascular dementia as she has progressively been immobile. A year ago walked with a shuffling gait, now she is in my home falls a lot and cannot move her feet. Sad but a relief to hear others have this. She had whole brain radiation after sclc chemo five years ago. Possibly this is long term side effect. She says that Parkinson's meds didn't help but I ddont know if she ever really took them. Her squamous lung cancer is back in lung and one small potential Mets to liver and spleen, how does this effect her movement? The hospice nurse said the cancer is wiping her out. Any thoughts? I'm nervous that any PT would wipe her out more... I also don't know if she really gave the meds a solid try, she was out of state back then
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Cwillie, I too want to know the reasons behind things, even if there has to be acceptance of the status quo. It helps me to know the why.
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My mom has so many advanced problems that docs have all stopped looking for answers and are basically focusing on keeping her comfortable.
I on the other hand am curious as to the reasons behind things, which usually causes me endless frustration. Better perhaps to just accept things as they are and deal with problems day by day.
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Mea culpa - I was glad to think that Maggie was back and posting and didn't even check the original posting date.

Cwillie, have the doctors thought of any reason why your mother's one leg suddenly becomes immobile?
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Cwillie and GardenArtist, have not heard from Maggie since 2015, Dec.
However, you are right about this post.
Not able to walk is perplexing, and may originate in the spinal chord or brain.
It may be the result of stroke, TIA, lumbosacral radiculopathy, other disease processes such as parkinsons, multiple sclerosis, fractures of spine, hip pain,
and probably alzheimers/dementia. I would look for a diagnosis starting with a neurologist. Especially with stroke or TIA, rehab can help return to the ability to walk. With some diagnoses, such as parkinsons or MS, the condition can come and go, get better, then return.
With parkinsons, the patient may freeze up. We had success by placing foot-shaped brightly colored stepping-reminders (like drawing feet on the sidewalk in chalk) in front of the patient's pathway. Focusing on this new information, he placed one foot ahead of another and became unfrozen! Another time he was observed to drop something, and focusing on picking it up unfroze him. We tried throwing stuff at his feet, progressing further and further out-that worked too.

That must be the miracle televangelists who do healings are looking for to put on the t.v. lol?
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This is an old thread revived, but it has me wondering if Maggie ever solved the problem, lately my mom was doing the same thing but only with one leg, she would be walking along and suddenly that leg just wouldn't go.
Of course she isn't walking at all right now but I am still hopeful she can get back on her feet.
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Maggie, 2014
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Maggie, I've been wondering if you had left or where you were. It's good to see you back again, but I wish it were under different circumstances.

I'm wondering as well about spinal cord issues - has she mentioned any unusual sensations in her spine, back, lower back, hips or upper legs?
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is there any cure for unable to move my feet
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All very helpful answers. Thank you!

But CountryMouse!! I demand you stop recording us in the privacy of my home!!

Honestly, that sounds just like me! Same words! Same Aaaaaargggh! Lordy! Last night, I tried to use the wheelchair after an unsuccessful attempt with her on her feet. Me Aaaaarggghing.

She was MAD. Took her in the bedroom to go on the potty, and she wouldn't get up. "Leave me alone!! Will you PLEASE hush!!!" I ended up leaving her in her chair for about half an hour in their to cool down. Invited her to just sleep there.

I asked Tom to go in. Lo and behold, she was finally ready to go to bed.

And now she's clamoring to get up.

Tom suggested we get her into bed earlier. (Now it's about 10 PM.) These new symptoms are 'just lately' and always at night. I may try that, but if she wakes at the crack of dawn, that won't work.

I'm taking advice here. No walking after 6 PM. I'll see if that helps.

But, seriously, Countrymouse. No more recording. ;)
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Maggie, I'd report that straight away. My mother started doing that after her (small) strokes last year - it's really quite baffling when you're both standing there looking down at her feet, and you're saying "move your left foot back. No, the left. No, move - what's the matter with your foot??? Move it back! Aaaaaargggh! - I said BACK - !!!"

Presumably in my mother's case it's co-ordination controls going haywire, but if your mother has been diagnosed with Parkinson's my money would be on that. Don't despair, PT can help with balance exercises (if you have more luck than I did getting your mother to DO them).
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This freezing is a symptom of Parkinson's. Just heard a talk about this in the last month or so. Get her back to the doctor and to physical therapy to know best how to help her.
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MaggieMarshall, if Mom has Parkinson's, the answer probably lies there. It was once "mild" but it is a progressive disease. Also, your profile says she has dementia. The kind of dementia most commonly associated with Parkinson's is Lewy Body Dementia. She has also had a stroke, and that is commonly associated with vascular dementia. ("Commonly" does not mean always.)

There are plenty of explanations of why she can't get her feet to move as she wants them to within her Parkinson's and dementia. Discuss this with her doctor.

I wonder if switching to a wheelchair in the evenings would be a relief to both of you? Let Mom continue walking with your help earlier in the day, to maintain the strength she needs to transfer. Push her around later in the day. Also use a wheel chair out of the house, such as shopping, visiting a museum, any of that kind of outing. It reduces frustration and makes the entire experience more pleasant for both of you.
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Maggie, does your mom have AD? I thought I had read that somewhere....?

Up until 5 months ago my mother was walking pretty darn good....it was almost an overnight change... the shuffling started and scared to move, then stepping over sunbeams and yellow lines.... her eyesight is still great, her perception is gone. And or, maybe. her mind is confused at how to walk? This is just based on how my mother is.... she gets so confused on how things work, she will just stand there for awhile and try to regain thoughts/actions that are gone.

Sorry.... it is hard
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Look up Parkinsonian Gait in Wikipedia and ask the MD about meds combined with visual and auditory cueing. Or look up "Parkinson's FOG" (freezing of gait).
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No, FreqFlyer. She's never had that complaint. She says she's telling her feet to move, but they won't. I'm wondering if it's Sundowner's gone wild....?
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Maggie, does your Mom have arthritis in her hips, legs, knees or feet? Maybe by evening it becomes really uncomfortable. Just a thought.
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