Would my Mom (95) who lives with mid-stage Alzheimer's disease benefit from either a low dose or mild anti-anxiety medication?

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Mom has lived with Alzheimer's Disease for over six years. Until recently, she slept soundly through the entire night. She now lies in bed all night talking to herself. She doesn't fall asleep until early in the morning and then wants to sleep all day. Her self-conversations seem to focus on undefined or imagined worries. I assume that this behavior is a product of anxiety which is a common symptom of Alzheimer's Disease. I hesitate to discuss anti-anxiety medications such as Xanax with her doctor because of her advanced age and the attendant risks. Am I being too cautious? After all, her new behavior poses no real health or safety risk.

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My mother takes Celexa, Namenda, Aricept, and Serequel to address anxiety, memory and agitation. She also takes Trazadone to sleep. I've found that all of these meds have made a world of difference.
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Ativan does little to nothing for my mom. Remeron has been a gift from G-d.
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Another thing that works great for my Mom is B12. The difference in my Mom's mental state when she takes it compared to when she doesn't is amazing. They give her 250mcg along with her other medicine.
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HA, my guess is lorazepam (ativan). Anybody else? By the way, it is not working for us, doc wants to start mirtazapine (remeron).
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Reserpine?
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Risperdal, maybe
?
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Renee66, What is razapayne??
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I would say she needs something to calm her down razapayne.my husband takes it and it takes the edge off .and the best thing is u take it at night with the other meds for dementia.
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3mg slow melt melatonin works for my mom who is 93 late stage alz.
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I agree with much that has been said before about consulting with a doctor and being willing to try medications and see what works best for your Mom. We did this with Dad and found the combination of things that worked for him.

In addition, you might try music. There is a documentary "Alive Inside" that talks about this. In short, put music that your Mom loved when she was young on an iPod shuffle ($49 new). Many people have old ones around. Get some over the ear headphones ($10- 15 at Best Buy - avoid earbuds). Let her listen to the music as a way to settle down. I tried this with my Dad and it was amazing how he perked up and seemed to really enjoy listening. You also might want to get a headphone jack splitter so you can listen with her.
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