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Mom is 83 and in excellent health.....except for moderate stage dementia (lewy body). Neurologist started with two meds six months ago. First drug is helping a great deal with cognition, mood, and speech. Second is helping with hallucinations -- altho first drug might be increasing hallucinations. I can't seem to research the other problem because, frankly, I can't even think of what it might be called. I did try allot of searches on this board and the internet.

She thinks there is more than one of me. Even tho we are the most familiar people, only caregiving support (husband and I), and she stays in our very familiar house frequently. She asked my husband, "Do you live with three women". It is not just me, she think there is more than one of my Sister (she rarely sees) and my Aunt (she sees often). We think everything is fine and she is doing well and you have NO IDEA when she is thinking you're someone else. Or not really someone else, just extra people. She doesn’t think I’m a cousin or sister or another person, just multiple people.

I have read about people having difficulty 'recognizing relatives', but I haven't read about this splitting them into multiple entities. What is this called? How common is it? Would changing to a different hallucination drug be helpful?

Thanks in advance.

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You may want to test her for a UTI infection, as sometimes a bladder infection can cause confusion in older folks. Sometimes an undiagnosed UTI infection can make dementia seem more severe. Most drug stores sell at-home UTI test kits for about $12.00.
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Aladyncal I don't know about a name for it, other than it being associated with dementia...

This should make you feel better:

Just today about 30 minutes ago my Mom was sitting on the deck and I was cleaning my pool, which is right there, we were talking. When I finished I sat with her for about 10 minutes... I got up and said I was going inside, asked her if she wanted to come in, "NO" was her answer. Well, 10 minutes later she came in and was upset because "everyone left her alone outside".? Then she proceeded to tell me that my sister from out of state who she hadn't seen or spoken to in 2 years was cleaning the pool and someone else (she forgot who, it was me) was sitting there and just got up and left...

So you're not alone.. Dementia stinks...
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Thank you, I appreciate your comments.

Is this a COMMON thing where they somehow split people into extra personalities? Is there a name for this?

She's been doing really well 'in general', even having a part time job up until eight months ago. We are currently looking into extra care for her and all the options, but having had my Step Father in memory care, we can see that it isn't appropriate for her at this stage.
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One of the core identifiers with Lewy Body dementia is vivid and detailed hallucinations. They are increased when the patient is moved, as in going to your place. The sensory stimulation of transport and change of surroundings is detrimental. Talk to the MD about what is safe for her, I have a feeling he will recommend a NH or Memory Care facility. So sorry.
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Thanks so much, but this doesn't really apply directly to our situation. I really want to understand what this is called and what is happening.

She is NOT in a facility. She lives in her own apartment and, for the last several years, she spends 2-3 days at our home every other week. The rest of the time, we see her every couple days.
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One of the key strategies with Lewy Body patients is to keep their environment and schedule on a steady course. That usually means NOT taking them out for home visits, which are confusing and trigger hallucinations. Even a simple change of outfit can make her think you are someone else. Going to a family gathering can be totally overwhelming. Better to have one on one visits with her in her facility, take turns, keep it short. I would even go so far as to wear the same clothes each time I see her. If there is a family dog, bring him, because pets seem to embed deeply in memory and are very calming to touch. Even the crankiest dementia patient calms down with his dog.
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