When my Mom became incontinent with her bladder and bowels did she become late stage? - AgingCare.com

When my Mom became incontinent with her bladder and bowels did she become late stage?

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Incontinence can come at a much earlier stage for some people so this isn't a likely gauge. If you are wondering about a specific person - such you in your case - it's best to talk with the person's doctor.

In late stage dementia people often can't swallow, can't communicate, doesn't recognize people and has other symptoms. As I said - people all vary as does Alzheimer's.

Take care of yourself,
Carol
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This is one of the many things i hate about it....i continually worry about whats going to change in my mom next....
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Not necessarily. It depends on the foods and liquids she has consumed, but a consult with her doctor is certainly in order. My mother went six years before her passing with incontinence.
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Stages are not set in stone. There are usually numerous indications or "symptoms" from stage to stage. One symptom may be more typical in on stage or other, but not always. Sometimes incontinence may be only temporary. I still try to teach people about Kegles and strengthening the muscles that shut off urine flow. Use them or lose them. Also, sometimes withholding BMS or urination will result in incontinence, so a regular schedule to the bathroom might be in order. Above all, be sure she is getting plenty of fiber in her diet and enough liquids to keep things moving and soft.
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AD goes in stages, with distinct plateaus. Check this link http://m.alz.org/stages-of-alzheimers.asp for all the symptoms to gauge your loved one's progression. Best wishes.
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I always wonder about my husband, and I read the 'signs" as mentioned above, but some of these things we all do, i.e. forgot the names of people we just met, etc. My husband does have incontinence issues...but not sure what is causing it..and he won't go in to have it checked! He also is disorganized but then he has always been that way and a procrastinator. So that's his 'normal'. He doesn't bath very often either and that has been an issue. So really don't know if I'm seeing signs of dementia or Alzheimer's or not.
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I think that some patients are late stage with some things, but not others. Eventually, they may end up with all of the symptoms of late stage, if they survive.

I look at the symptoms of the stages regularly to monitor my loved ones status. She seems to have all the symptoms of Late stage, except that she can still talk and feed herself. She's incontinent both ways, can't walk or take care of any of her daily needs, except feeding. She can use her feet to propel herself in her wheelchair. She doesn't really carry on a conversation, but she can answer your questions yes or no. Mostly, she says she doesn't know or can't remember to everything you ask. So determining her stage is difficult, since she does have some ability left.
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Incontinence is not always a symptom of dementia or Alz, though it does go hand-in-hand with it in the very late stages. It can be a symptom of many other things. It depends very much on your loved one's health and other medical issues before demential or Alz even comes into the picture. My mother, for example, had 4 children and is very overweight. By the time she was in her mid-60's, she was leaking urine quite a bit of the time. Not major floods, mind you, but stress incontinence, where she would leak if she coughed or sneezed, or when she stood up from a sitting position. Anything that would put stress on the pelvic floor muscles (which we use to "squeeze" to hold urine in). Now, over 10 years later, she is almost completely incontinent of her urine, but is still continent with her bowels and is at stage 3/4 with her dementia (memory issues, can't remember how to do things in proper order, misplaces things because she doesn't know where to put them, can't make decisions without help).
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sorry, that's "dementia" not "demential". I fat-fingered the keys.
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Good answers and very helpful. So far my partner has no issues with this. I am not looking forward to that part of care. He still goes to the bathroom with no issues, other than constipation now and then. KASHI, with regards to bathing. My partner is short on the bathing also. I talked to the nurse in Memory Care (he is not there but I have a friend in the memory care unit), and she said they bath the patients twice a week. She told me that the skin of the elderly is not helped by to much bathing. I have no idea what that means. But, she also said some only get a bath once a week. So, I don't worry to much with my Partner. We do not have a walk in shower so, I have to struggle with getting him into the tub in stages. It is horrible. I finally made up my mind that he will not be using the tub any longer. It is too much for me. So, I will be bathing him as I dress him every morning or at least twice a week. He is sensative and gets rashes easily. We have to keep his skin moist with Triamcinolone Acetonide (prescription). On top of that, moisturizer. This gets on his clothes and he has to wear socks to bed and even after washing the clothes still feel like they have moisturizer in the fabic. The dermatologists WANTS this. I have to run hot water and bleach in my washer at least once a week as a build up occurs around the tub. I wish I had two washers.
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