My mother was diagnosed with advanced Alzheimer's and refuses care. Can we declare her incompetent? - AgingCare.com

My mother was diagnosed with advanced Alzheimer's and refuses care. Can we declare her incompetent?

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She hallucinates and the meds are not helping. But otherwise she is fairly lucid. Can we declare her incompetent?

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People with Lewy body dementia in particular may be worse on this class of medication, either motor or cognitively. Sometimes they are very helpful and reasonably well tolerated though. Increasing the dose to see if she does better or worse on it may be the only way to really tell anything and is not an unreasonable thing to try. If it makes her worse though, clearly, after allowing for the usual ups and downs anyone can have, probably don't go up any more on it and see if they would try a different approach altogether. Side effects are a tricky business. Some people get hallucinations on suprisingly common and usually benign medications, and older people may get side effects on meds they used to tolerate as well.
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I do not live in the same town; my brother, who lives with her, says she is getting it, but I do think it is difficult for him to be consistent with her. The doctor recently doubled her dosage.
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Aha. LATUDA(R) (lurasidone HCl) is a potent antipsychotic. Does she actually take it?
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Lotuda. Sorry!
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Hey - what is Ludatol? Dr. Google does not seem to know. Maybe it is making her worse...Remember, just being "aware" and recognizing people does NOT rule out dementia, particularly non-Alzhemier's dementia. Something is not right here, and it may well be the diagnosis and treatment.
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Thank you all for your answers. I agree that I'd like to try more meds.
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If your mom has been diagnosed with advanced Alzheimer's she probably won't be allowed to sign a POA any more. That is something that needs to be done before a person deteriorates to the point that your mother seems to be at. If she's anything like my dad, she probably wouldn't be able to sign her name anyway, or understand what the attorney explains to her. It sounds like her GP did the proper thing in sending her to a specialist...someone who knows the disease inside and out. I would say that perhaps a change in meds might help her out; sometimes you have to try out a few before you find one that helps to any degree, and most don't work anymore beyond a certain point. Some don't work to begin with; it just depends on the person. It sounds like she needs someone with her all the time; but unless she's declared incompetent I wouldn't think there's anything you can do unless she hurts herself or someone else.
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BerkeleyCA, it really does sound like someone must take over care decisions for her. Are her doctors on board with that?
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Good questions, JeanneGibbs. She won't sign DPOA, for one. She won't allow others to come in to help...it's difficult to get her to the doctor. In hospital for heart palps, she up and left. She recently carried a knife under her sleeve, has roamed, and doesn't eat. Her vision also is very poor--legally blind. But, she is aware enough to refuse help!
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A declaration of incompetency must be done by a court, usually on the advice of two doctors. Do her doctors think she is incompetent? If she is declared incompetent would you then want to be appointed her guardian, to make care decisions for her?

When you say she refuses care, do you mean that she won't allow someone to come into the house to help her? What tactics had you tried?

Do you feel she is at a point where she cannot safely live alone, even with help?
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