Mom (84) has advanced stage dementia and needs 6 teeth pulled and a set of dentures. Any advice?

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we went to the dentist who advised that mom, needs 6 teeth removed. They said if she doesn't it could cause worse problems later. They are not bothering her now. Another dentist said she didn't need more than 2 teeth removed and wanted to work on the rest. I don't know what To do. Do I go for a third opinion? We have Medicaid and they will pay for extractions and partials, both dentists know we only have Medicaid.
I'm not sure how mom would cope with the extractions, healing process and the adjustment to having to wear partials. When I ask her she sometimes understands but is vague and at other times she clearly doesn't understand what I'm saying as she starts talking about something unrelated.
I know her teeth are bothering her a lot and she talks about them and often cries because there are so many missing. I don't want her to spend the rest of her days embarrassed of herself and afraid to smile and that is how she feels
What can I do to make sure I do everything that is correct and at the same time, help her feel good about her teeth. She says she doesn't smile because of her teeth but when she catches herself smiling she sinks into a deep depression. I still have to see an oral surgeon because no dentist will extract her teeth because of being on Prolio.

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I am with the others. Why put mom through that? Just because Medicaid will pay the bill? This is extensive dental work. How many trips to the dentist would be required? To say nothing about pain and her not able to understand what is going on. Skip it. If something begins to create problems with pain, then deal with it one at a time.

She doesn't like her smile? She is advanced dementia. Does she still recognize herself in the mirror? She feels embarassed? My mom is advanced as well and embarrassment is not a concern of hers, she is not able to process information to develop any sort of logical reaction.

Who is really more embarassed about her teeth?
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She has late stage dementia and the teeth could get even worse later on? Later on like when ... a year from now? Three years from now? Do these dentists understand that she has a terminal disease?
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Your poor mom. My dad, who had dementia, had several teeth pulled and a partial plate fitted, but then NEVER wore it. He couldn't remember he had it; he couldn't care for it, and he couldn't get it into his mouth. (and he had me and my brother to try to help him do all these things...he just wouldn't.) He had to deal with healing up his gums and then never got the benefit of the partial plate. So I would say leave her alone, too, and don't ask her to go through this, unless the bad teeth are a threat to her health. Do you trust those dentists to do what's right for your mom, and not just to be trolling for Medicaid payments?
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I would discuss this with her medical doctor. If she has advanced dementia then most likely she will have a difficult time adjusting to dentures or partials and she could take them out and just throw them away. If she has advance dementia, then she will probably not know she doesn't have teeth. If she is eating regular foods now, as her dementia progresses she may only be able to eat pureed or soft foods. I can understand about wanting to look nice and smile and I can understand she may be horrified if she has no teeth. I think you have to weigh the pros with the cons. If her teeth are bothering her and she needs a filling and can tolerate that, then I'd do a filling. The first thing I'd do if it were me is talk it over with her doc. Good luck.
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Leave things as they are. If she develops pain, than have that tooth pulled. No need to put her through unnecessary pain.
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