Since I only have sons, I would love to know the ratio of men caregivers vs. female caregivers. Would anyone have a clue of these statistics. - AgingCare.com

Since I only have sons, I would love to know the ratio of men caregivers vs. female caregivers. Would anyone have a clue of these statistics.

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As I visit this website often for tips and companionship in caring for my mother in my home, it seems to me the great percentage of caretakers are women. Having only two sons, that are attached to wives, I wonder if I have any chance of either of them being there when I need help as I age. It seems to me they will run in the opposite direction, or expect their wives to jump in to get them off the hook? I would love to hear about some sons who jumped in to help with caretaking.

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Don't worry about having only sons. I am caring for my mother-in-law with little help from my sister-in-law.
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TO: GPHC1:
Good for you and your son. Uplifting to know that there are some men who can face this end stage of life with compassion for those who need it so much.
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My wife and I have an assisted living facility and I work 16 hours a day 6 days a week. I have people to help in the morni g with dressing and washing and stuff but after breakfast it's all me. If somebody has an accident or problem I have to take care of it. Also our 18 year old son has worked for us for 2 years and he does a very good job with our residents. Have 2 daughters 16 and 17 don't want any thing to do with it. They were all raised in this environment because we had my grandma for last six years of her life with Alzheimer's before we started the biz.
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I'm single, male and the only child. I cared for my dad before he died 7 years ago and caring for my mother now. I had no help whatsoever from relatives.
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I;m the only girl of 7 siblings.My mom is 98 about to become 99.She has alzheimer's disease.Of my 3 surviving brothers,only 2 really did anything to help in the care of mother.They think that's woman's work..The Lord said to honor your parents so that your days may be long upon this earth.ALL should help because our moms took care of us as infants and it's time to take care of her.God bless you all.
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At my moms AFH for dementia - half the care givers are men and they really are great. Very caring and wonderful with the residents. I don't think the gender matters if the person has the patience and temperment for caring for others.
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I am a single male and only child. I have been caring for my mother who has been living with Alzheimer's Disease for four years. It is a difficult and lonely existence. I resent high profile advocates like Maria Shriver who chose to ignore male caregivers like me and focus exclusively on the needs of female caregivers. I ask, what is it about the female caregiving experience that is unique? I face the same daily challenges faced by any female caregiver. We should celebrate and support all caregivers regardless of gender, age, or marital status. We all do God's work.
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Well my MIL lives with me & hubby her youngest son oldest two daughters that she always did everything for dont do nothing for her now and my only helper is other brother who is single dad and 5 years older than my husband..so, guess it all depends with the family situations also couldnt do it if I had to work outside the home my MIL has alzheimers and health problems so she is 24/7....
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I guess it depends on factors like: are they married and wife willing; how close you are to son; their circumstances. Variables.
I'm taking. Are ofmy mother but do not plan on being taken care of by my only child. Daughter. I peronally want to die before I get old and crusty.
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After going through what I have for the past three years, I would never subject another human to having to take care of me. Senior communities with different levels of care are the way to go. And no, I won't change my mind when I get there. I have a feeling the boomers and later will be more adaptable than their parental generation was. Boomers and later have been used to moving several times in their lives. They are used to change.
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