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I feel for the frustration expressed in your wording of your question.

No, of course it's not unreasonable to expect that those responsible for your father's and other residents' wellbeing will make sure that everyone ends up in his or her own bed. But there is an interval during which taking deep breaths and having faith that they'll get there eventually is more appropriate than flipping your lid about it. It's a question of what is practically achievable. Would you like to say a bit more about what's happened?
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A lot depends on the type and size of the memory care facility -

A year ago there were some very scary men in the room opposite from mom and they were always coming into her room -

even mom's roommate doesn't stay put when they get her to bed and I've found her in mom's bed with her feet on the pillows -

by and large once they are put to bed, staff will only check a couple of times during the night not the every 2 hours that people assume is happening
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If this were happening in a regular AL I would say it is time for a memory care place. But it sounds as if that is where Dad is. Yes, the staff should ensure that all residents sleep in their own beds. But that might not happen instantaneously, unless someone reports him. Is the care center doing a good job in other respects?
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When my mother with moderate dementia moved to her current assisted living memory care, she would get agitated in the evenings, wander around, go into other people's rooms, and lie on their beds. She wasn't sleeping properly at night and was anxious during the day. Psychiatrist doubled the low dose of sertraline she was already on and added Namenda, which she said could help with the disturbed sleep cycle. The combination has seemed to work well and I don't hear anymore about wandering at night. So ... if your dad is winding up in other people's beds, there might be a medicinal solution.

As to the staff noticing if he is in his own bed ... in the memory care places I've seen, the staff is supposed to peek in and check on each resident regularly, including every hour or two at night. If residents don't appear for meals, staff go and find them. Generally, staff assist residents in getting ready for bed. Housekeeping is in and out of rooms frequently, and they're familiar with who belongs where. So yes, staff should notice if people are in the wrong place, but it might take an hour or two to notice.
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Zaisie, my Dad lived in Assisted Living/Memory Care, and the Staff knew who wanders and crawls into an empty bed. If there is a triage situation happening, the Staff might not get to do their rounds as quickly.

My Dad [95] had a situation where he came back to his room to find this lady asleep on top of his bed. Dad quickly called me. I told Dad to look for an Aide or buzz his medical alert. Dad was all worried that he would get into trouble if they find that lady in his bed. He said he tried to wake her up with no luck. I told Dad to sit out in the living room common area until an Aide came.

Turned out this lady would wander and get into other resident's empty beds as she was lost, so the Aides got her up and took her back to her room. Dad was relieved he didn't get into trouble. It did make for good conversation for the next couple of days. It never happened again, even though my Dad always kept his door opened all day until the Aide got him ready for bed.
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If residents are complaining then it may be time for the next level of care. ALs are designed for providing 2 to 3 hours of personal care and assistance and not 24 hours of one on one care. Talk to the administrator but start looking one step ahead. Several residents in my mom's place had the same occurrences. When I visited she was highly agitated when this man arrived and even though she has memory problems, she always talked about it and she was feeling stress. Think of how the other residents are feeling and stop placing blame on the staff. His mind is broken and it will not get any better.
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