Memory care is expensive. Did anyone else have to supply the toilet paper? - AgingCare.com

Memory care is expensive. Did anyone else have to supply the toilet paper?

Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
14

Answers

Show:
I think assisted living is viewed more like having an apartment so supplying toilet paper makes more sense. But a memory unit is like a nursing home in most instances so I'm surprised about the toilet paper. However, if the unit is in an assisted living facility, that may explain the rule.

At any rate, it the important things are okay, supplying toilet paper is an inconvenience but not a deal breaker. It will be interesting to see what others have experienced.
Carol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

As an owner of a personal care home I know first hand why the assisted living facility might require you to provide toilet tissue. It is unbelievable how much toilet tissue some residents use and waste. It's nothing to go into the restroom and see what looks like an entire roll of toilet tissue balled up in the waste basket. I'm convinced that people with mental health issues have an infatuation with toilet tissue. I have one resident who hides it in her purse. Others take rolls of tissue for their own emergency supply. Others use it excessively when they use the restroom. Whatever the case may be our residents go through so much toilet tissue I sometimes can't believe it. I truly wish there was a way to control the use and misuse of toilet tissue a little better. Even small costs add up.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

How about purchasing in bulk from a medical supply center. I'd suggest checking prices online. If there's a medical supply store near you, then try there. I'm thinking the store will be more expensive but it will keep your local stores open. If she's somewhat cognizant and understands, you may want to take a few rolls at a time, asking she not use as much. Kleenex is another problem I had with my mother in that she's use the entire box each day.

If you are POA, you can use her money to pay for this.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I can't see how toilet paper really affects a bottom line; the most expensive line item has got to be the staff costs. But if the TP runs out it is pretty darn annoying. There are new electronic toilets which spray wash & dry, so maybe that would avoid buying TP....but at a few thousand dollars a unit, the TP suddenly seems rather affordable, except for Medicaid recip who only has $30/month.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

My Dad is in a Memory Care Unit. They DO supply toilet paper, but due to the 'waste' that others mentioned above, the toilet paper is NOT on the roll, but is stored in the cupboard under the sink. That storage area opens in a secret way so the residents cannot get into it. When we use his own private BR, we were told how to access it. Otherwise, we use the public one in his cottage, which is always stocked properly. I think it's also a matter of the residents clogging the toilets if left to themselves. When my Dad was first admitted, he got up in the night time, in his room, and he removed most of the toilet apparatus and also another time, he took the mini fridge out of it's cubby hole and started to 'work' on it. He took his own TV apart in back and we had to remove that and take it in for repairs. His career was as an electrical engineer and he was used to 'working on things' himself....so in his agitation, he was apparently just looking for something to do...and found some things to 'fix'!
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Tryingmybest: My Dad continues with his cute stories. I never tell him they are not true....I tell him that he is having an 'amazing' time....and that it sure sounds like he is working hard and that I am sure everyone appreciates what a helper he is there where he lives! Invariably, he has been out driving somewhere.... and sometimes, you know, he 'drives' to work from Arizona to the backwoods in Maine, doing some logging or working at the Mill, because they 'called him in'. You know those younger guys, they are not willing to work hard like the old experienced ones will do!! Other times, he has to sort of supervise his 'place', because he can tell they don't know what they are doing with everyone, cause no place should EVER have that kind of commotion he's had to look at all day long! So he has to sit and take notes and then wait for the 'big boss' to come by checking on things (the 'big boss' is the LPN who is in charge of the staff, and she's barely 5' tall, but everyone seems to know she's the 'boss'!) so he can talk to her and tell her what's really happening that needs to be fixed. And, in variably, he always has some realm of reality that is part of his 'story' too....There are a couple residents who yell and chant and try to get out of their chairs at times, and are alarmed in...and it's havoc on their bad times. That is what he sees as 'commotion'. He prefers it to be peace and quiet. And sometimes the young maintenance guy will come get him, to 'help' with some repairs around the place.....but Dad will then think HE is the boss and HE is teaching the young guy what to do. They all just know how to work with him. And he's so cute if someone falls or gets hurt or passes out...my Dad is right there on the scene acting like the medic or the Daddy....wanting to help be sure they are safe. He's very gentle with the ladies and very polite and willing to help them....just as he was when all was intact. It 'hurts' him when a lady is the one ranting and yelling and not acting like a lady....and he will tell us about that too..... 'Something must be very wrong in her life for her to act like that'....or words to that effect! I just enjoy looking for the frame of reference that has some reality to it....and there always is. Sometimes I have to ask the caregivers what the activities were earlier in the day, to find out how it relates to his story....but it IS always there somehow. My poor Mom cannot process like this with him....and she just shuts down and won't talk to him, or spends her time trying to tell him he doesn't know what he's talking about...then they start to have a spat with each other. I try to tell her to just go along....just say, " Oh that's really interesting!" for example. WELL...it IS really interesting to me...even when it's not real. It's like someone telling you their dream first thing in the morning! But HE just likes having the conversation with someone...anyone...and it helps him so much to feel engaged with us and the world.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Bathroom tissues and regular tissues were supplied at the Memory care center I used for my Mom. We supplied body wash, hand creams, etc. Bathroom tissue supplied at MIL's regular AL. Actually, there were 10 rolls in her room the other day! : - ) Perhaps this is a regional thing? I visited 8 different ALs in my area and ALL supplied the basics that you describe. On the other hand, the minimum monthly charges was over $6000!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I think all or all most all of the assisted living that I looked at, you had to supply toilet paper. Doesn't seem right in a memory care!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My mom's memory care supplies the toilet paper. The assisted living unit does not. Not sure why.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

People develop fondness for particular brands/quality of toilet paper. Maybe that is why some families are asked to provide it?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

See All Answers
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions