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Lately my Mom has slurred speech off and on and drools. We notice that it seems to happen after all the meds are given. We haven't figured out yet which medicine is causing this, (if it is indeed a med) Constantly complains of headache, have retina specialist appointment coming up, we are thinking another change in glasses due to changes with vision. Any ideas on the speech and drooling?

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HI Fraulein,
Yes, the slurred speech and drooling could be caused by medications. So could the headaches, though it's very wise to get her eyes taken care of, as well. A pharmacist may be able to help you and the doctor decide which drug she takes may be most likely to be causing the symptoms. The only reliable way to tell would be to try eliminating one drug at a time, and you should only do that with the doctor's help.
Real time makes a point in that if a medication change happened shortly before the symptoms, the new drug could be the likely culprit.
You sound as though you're taking good care of your mom. Work with the professionals and you'll know that you're doing the best for her that you can.
Take care,
Carol
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Slurred speech is generally thought of in the context of stroke/mini-stroke symptoms, but if slurred speech and drooling is occurring only in the context of having taken medications, it could be caused by medications that can produce drowsiness, of which there are many. Slurred speech and drooling caused by medications could also occur in the context of medications causing dystonic reactions although there are usually other more visually obvious signs of dystonic reaction besides slurred speech (i.e. intermittent muscle spasms, oftentimes in the face).

You will want to talk to your mother's doctor to further evaluate her symptoms, and if they are indeed thought to be related to medication, deduce which medication(s) may be the culprit.

If you have further questions about this topic or others, feel free to contact me directly (click on my profile for details).

Hope this helps. Best wishes.

Vik Rajan, M.D.

DISCLAIMER
The health information provided above is FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY, and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE MEDICAL ADVICE/OPINION, is not meant to diagnose or treat any illness or disease, and is not a substitute for the medical evaluation and advice of your (or your loved one’s) primary care physician or other medical professional. No doctor-patient relationship is established with this interaction. While striving to be factual and exact, no warranties are made with regards to the accuracy of the information provided above. You are always advised to talk with your (or your loved one’s) doctor about any health concerns that you have and about any of the information provided here. Sole reliance on the information provided above is not advised and would be solely at your own risk and liability.
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Fraulein, It's certainly worth checking with her physician on the meds. This happened to my mother. She had recently been switched from Xanax to Klonapin for anxiety. The doctor took her off Klonapin and her voice and level of alertness cleared up quickly. She still has incidences of it when she's tired, but now it's rare.
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I would not wait any longer - I would get medical attention immediately. My mother had slurred speech after meds, and then suffered a stroke. Something is seriously wrong - so not to alarm you, but I would go to emergency room and let them check her out, esp right after taking the meds when the symptoms are there.
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I thin the first thing is to mention in a post like this what medications she is taking. I agree with above...DO NOT STOP until professionally advised. I am physician with 30 years experience so this could be quite simple to fix with an MD......unfair to expect pharmacist to make those calls.
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There is another situation that this might indicate,has she had a fall lately and bumped her head? My father has Normal pressure hydroceaphlus(water on the brain) Yhis caused him the same symptums you describe with also a walking problem, took him to a neurologist who figured this out.(he had a fall+ headaches so they did a CAT scan- no concussion so they sent him home ( a month later I insisited on the neurologist visit and using the SAME CAT film diagnosed Dad with NPH)
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Another thing maybe worth checking into would be the possiblility your Mom has experienced a small stroke? The slurring of speech and headaches would be a possible sign. My aunt was experiencing many headaches, and her speech became slurred. She'd had a small stroke. Later more strokes, which eventually led to her death. So, just a possiblility that a CT Scan could rule out. Best of luck.
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YES I DO. Stop all meds unless it very immortant. Trust me my mother is 90 don't look it just eats well good balanced meals no junk just a little a day here and there. Well at least I can say for my mother she never took any kind of medications from the Drs and does better without all the medication the Dr says she needs it. Ha Ha that's a laugh cause my mother almost died cause they said the Dr ordered it and she should take it. Well I know my mother better than any Dr If I think she needs it then I will. But i research everything on my own before I give my mother any medications from the Dr. Anyway my mother is doing fine and it was all the medications the Dr give my mom that almost killed her it killed my father last year because of ALL THE MEDS THE DRS prescribes! Good Luck!
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I agree with lightedpumken about it being better for elders to be on no meds, BUT - no one can abruptly stop any medications without an MD involved, for many of them cause withdrawal symptoms. Healthcare professionals often seek to prescribe meds for some people whose anxiety or depression seem to get out of hand, causing problems or risks. I happen to believe that closer attention and extra time with someone who is not a rotating-staff person - can often find sources of anxiety and help someone manage to solve the issues or find strategies - but that process is slow. The pts who are already not on meds are lucky as I see it, for meds may bring short term solutions, but stopping them is later a problem and few professionals even see that as desireable.
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The Omeprazole can increase the blood level of Xanax. This can increase the risk of side effects including excessive drowsiness and breathing difficulties. You may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Talk to your doctor before using Tramadol together with metoclopramide.

Fenofibrate can increase the effects of warfarin and cause you to bleed more easily.

Using warfarin together with traMADol may cause you to bleed more easily.

Using warfarin together with celecoxib may cause you to bleed more easily. You may need a dose adjustment based on your prothrombin time or International Normalized Ratio (INR).

Using ALPRAZolam, (Xanax), together with Tramadol may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating.

Using diphenhydramine-(Benedryl), together with traMADol may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating.

Celecoxib may increase the blood levels and effects of Tramadol. If your doctor does prescribe these medications together, you may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications.

Using metoprolol together with celecoxib can increase your blood levels of metoprolol. This can lower your blood pressure and slow your heart rate, causing side effects such as slow heartbeat, headaches, dizziness, or feeling like you might pass out. Talk with your doctor before using these medications together, and report any side effects promptly.

Using omeprazole together with furosemide may cause a condition called hypomagnesemia, or low blood magnesium. Drugs known as proton pump inhibitors including omeprazole can cause hypomagnesemia when used for a prolonged period, and the risk may be further increased when combined with other medications that also have this effect such as furosemide. In severe cases, hypomagnesemia can lead to irregular heart rhythm, palpitations, muscle spasm, tremor, or seizures.

Ask your doctor before using diphenhydramine-(Benedryl) and metoclopramide. Using these medications together may cause metoclopramide to be less effective. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Furosemide and diphenhydramine-(Benedryl) may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate.

I go to a great little dotcom called Drugs. I plug in every single medication and it gives me a list like the above I made for you. By the way, you really need to go to this website and do it for yourself. I abbreviated each result up there because the page of results from your drug list is very very long. I could not even show you all of the results. I suggest that you speak with your doctor and pharmacist with the results from that website all printed up. I understand that you would like your mother sedated, not sure why but. . . . anyways you probably should not do so, the diphenhydramine-(Benedryl), is just not a good idea. If your doctors will not sedate her, it's because her heart/lungs/kidneys/central nervous system cannot handle sedation. The drooling would be enough proof I would think.
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