Are there any medications that can help calm my mother with dementia down? - AgingCare.com

Are there any medications that can help calm my mother with dementia down?

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78 YEARS OLD MOTHER WAKES UP EARLY VERY AGITATED , SCREAMING OF STEALING HER MONEY OR THINGS, TRIED TO SPEAKE TO HER AND CALM HER DOWN , DID NOT WORK. ANY MED CAN CALM HER DOWN AND WHAT IS THE DOSE, SHE HAD HIP REPLACEMENT 3 MONTHS AGO , EASILY MOVING AROUND NOW, NOT LIKE BEFORE. PHYSICALY SHE IS IN A GOOD CONDITION , MENTALLY NOT AT ALL.

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Ask your doctor about aricept or namenda.
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rather than start with a anti-pshcotic like Seroquel (using in the elderly for dementia is an off-label use and doesn;t have FDA apprioval, though it is used all the time ; it also has negative effects on cognitive skills the next day) Talk to you Dr. abount benzodiazapanes - Ativan (lorazepam) can be quite helpful on low doses but can cause lightheadedness, drowsiness and dizziniess. It is often used in the evening to minimize this. I'm trying to keep my husband away from anything that would affect his cognitive skills beause he's very active.
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It is common and best practice to start a drug like seroquel at a low dose, observe reactions for a few weeks, and adjust dosage. It sounds like it is time to have the dose increased. Talk to the doctor.

Seroquel is not a drug one would use lightly, but when it is needed it can be a godsend. My husband (age 86, dementia) has been on 100 mg per day for about 9 years.

If it is still not working at a higher dose, then the doctor may want to try a different drug. Each brain is unique and one-size simply doesn't fit all! If it seems like trial-and-error that is just the nature of treating the brain -- it doesn't mean the doctor is incompetent.

Also continue to attempt calming her down by gently talking to her. Don't argue, though. Don't tell her she is wrong and no one is stealing her money, etc. Just reassure her that she is safe and you will take care of her. This will not take the place of a drug, but it can be a helpful supplement.
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is seroquel safe for her , her blood pressure and diabetes are under control
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Some meds do take longer to have an effect. My MIL is in a nursing home and I noticed he and the nurse adjusted and tried different meds several times before getting a combination that worked. Maybe you should call and have the nurse ask the doctor if you should have seen a difference by now?
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i did take her to the doctor and prescribed seroquil 25 mg twice a day , it has been 3 weeks using it with no difference
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In order to prescribe a med to help her, a doctor needs to see her.
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