Can a medically disabled, senior adult be forced to move and live in a place against their will?

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At what point will city, county and/or state agencies step in and force a single, elderly and medically disabled woman who is not able to care for herself and who is currently displaced due to a building fire that destroyed her apartment building, to either accept to move and live in an available/approved Section 8 HUD apartment that is outside the country where her apartment used to be or move to a nursing home?
In this scenario, the woman is 65 and lives off her social security benefits and Section 8 HUD support to pay for all her expenses including the 55-plus community apartment she had lived in for more than a decade prior to the fire in Nov. 2016. In this scenario, the woman has no friends or family living in the state of NY where she is located. The closest adult child lives more than 3,000 miles away and none of this woman’s children are able to provide her the care she needs in their homes. Additionally, the woman is not medically cleared to travel on an airplane and it is unknown what other form of transportation would be suitable to transport the woman from the East to West Coast given her medical condition and poor health. In this scenario, the woman is very adamant about making 100% of the decisions regarding her health and where she lives, and will not accept any reasonable short or long-term solution that is not 100% what she wants. In this scenario, the woman has consistently refused trusted counsel from family, friends, medical professionals and volunteers from helping agencies, etc., who have all tried an infinite amount of times in-person, on the phone, video webcam, etc., to get her to make the right and best choice for herself and the level of care she needs, but all this communication has proved futile for more than two decades.
Since the fire in Nov. 2016, a person and/or organization stepped up and provided her temporary refuge/shelter at a local religious retreat through Dec. 31, 2016, and went as far to extend her stay a week or two, hoping she would have secured new Section 8 HUD approved/funded living accommodations; however, this did not happen, and when she went back into the hospital for medical treatment, her belongings were boxed up and she was told to have someone come and pick them up as they were not going to allow her to come back. Currently, she was released from the hospital to a rehab center; however, this is not fixing the current ongoing situation for this woman. She needs a new place to live. It sounds like a pretty simple process of submitting necessary Section 8 HUD paperwork and finding an approved apartment that meets her needs; however, nothing when it comes to this woman is every easy. She is adamant about staying in the county where she has lived for the better part of the last two decades and out-right refuses to accept to live outside the county, period dot, or inside the county if it means living in a nursing home of any kind, period dot. She will only accept to move and live in an approved Section 8 HUD apartment if it is located in the county where her hospital is located and services. She has and continues to refuse to accept and move outside the county to an approved Section 8 HUD apartment that meets all her needs. She also refuses, regardless of how short or long her stay might be until a Section 8 HUD approved apartment that meets her needs in the county becomes available, to move to any kind of nursing home as she repeatedly states these kind of places is where people go to die and that the cleanliness and professionalism of some of the people who work in them is unacceptable.
In this scenario, her children have no legal grounds/rights to force her to do anything she doesn’t want to, nor do they have the financial ability to pay for such legal services, nor do they want to take such legal actions either as such a trial would likely cause her to go into cardiac arrest and die during the trial due to her current health condition. What actions can city, county or state agencies or medical professionals take to force her to either move to an approved Section 8 HUD apartment outside the county and/or move to a nursing home until a Section 8 HUD approved apartment opens back up in the county where she wants to live? The word “force” is used because to get her to do anything she does not want or like, will require someone to legally “force” her to do it. Surprising enough, the children of the woman had contacted the area hospital and various family law attorneys in the county or adjacent counties where the woman has lived and none of them will return phone calls. Naturally, this posting is a condensed version of the entire story due to website limitations and am appreciative of any dialog you can provide which may shine a light on how this is likely to play out for this woman.

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The problem with her moving out of state is she has to start all over again. From what I understand, section 8 has a list. If she is on Medicaid, states different and she may have to establish residency before she can get any help. I have a friend who is and will be like this. She has a number of health problems but wants things her way. One thing ur friend needs to realize is she depends on the government. You do it their way.
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What it seems to me is that this aged homeless person has "trained" everyone around her how to cater to her wishes.  As the child of a narcissistic parent, who bad mouthed me plenty to anyone who would listen and who also refused services on anyone else's terms, I've heard this story before.

I think what we would call the original poster who is trying to rescue this lady, is "wonderful stranger." This person is the "only" person who can help, not because of his/her unique qualities, but because the poster has a soft heart and is easily manipulated by the aged lady. The aged lady can only be helped by the unique talents of this one hospital, where she's already trained everyone, because other hospitals won't put up with her garbage. She can't fly, not because of some medical problem, but because she does not want to fly to CA - very ill people can fly across the country and survive.

Her kids have heard this before and set boundaries - that's why they won't rescue her one more time. They've heard it all before, just like I did with mthr. Nope, my best guess is that this is a narcissist with a master's degree in manipulation.

She's a big girl now and she can live as she likes and solve her problems herself. Carmel, you are enabling her mental illness by continuing to help her. Step away and live your own life. She won't accept your help either, just as she has turned away everyone else.
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Well CarmelNY...seems you've come to the answer yourself. What will be will be. You can not help this woman who only wants things on her terms or no terms. You've tried, and Kuddos to you for that, and it's applaudable that you feel so deeply for her. I only hope you can find solice in the fact that you did, indeed, go above and beyond to try to help, and have peace in coming to terms with whatever will be will be. It's all up to her now, sad as that is. But the addage, you made your bed and now you must lie in it, seems to be tailor made for her situation. God bless you...and help you find peace beyond this woman. Live your life now and let her live (or die) hers as she sees fit. Good Luck!
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I would like to thank everyone for his or her thoughts and concerns.
As I mentioned from the beginning, truth be told, no matter what she says, she does not want to leave the county, (not country--this was an earlier misspelling), where she is for any reason, even if it were for her benefit of being able to get an approved Section 8 apartment that meets all her needs, simply because the hospital staff in the county where she has lived for about 25 years knows her entire medical history and all the doctors/nurses there are dialed-in and know how to keep her alive and properly treat all the different things going on in her body. She believes and has said based on her personal experience when she has had to temporarily go into a rehab center or other similar place for several weeks to a month in the past, the level of care and professionalism of the staffs at some/all of these facilities where she has gone in the past, according to her, do not and will not provide the same level of care and professional service and treatment she has always, according to her, received from the hospital she's been going to. Ultimately, when you boil it all down, she does not want to leave the county, period dot, because she believes she is going to die at the hands or care of a medical staff that does not know her medical history like the back of their hands. While there may be some other kind of administrative reason she is not telling me for why she does not want to move out of the county, (even if it meant she could move into an approved Section 8 apartment that meets all her needs), with regards to all her benefits, etc. that she currently receives, if there is, she has not made me aware of it. As stated before, she is adamant about not going to a NH because she wholeheartedly believes this is where people go to die, and she does not want to die.
So, what is a person in her situation to do: her Section 8 apartment building burned down and as best I have been told, is the only tenant who 'did not' have a renter's fire insurance policy, which would've helped pay for a place for her to live for several months or longer; however, this would not have fixed her long-term needs. She has no immediate family living near here--nearest is about 3,000 miles away and she has no friends in the area who are able to take her in either. So... ... ... she is technically a displaced medically disabled senior citizen with no other source of income beyond social security and medical benefits, as well as the support from Section 8, etc., who needs assistance about 8 hours of the day or more to do things such as bath her, cook for her, etc., the list goes on and on. The thing that is exacerbating her situation is the fact that she does not want to move/live outside the county for the medical reasons listed above.
It would seem everyone, for the most part, has come to the same general consensus: she needs to put her fears aside and make a rational decision to move outside the county and stay in the state where is currently living in, or, move all the way to California where her children and grandchildren live, but only if she medically cleared for cross-country travel via auto, plain or train, and all paperwork is ready and approved for the move and that a Section 8 apartment for her to move to is already set up and waiting for her and that there is a medical treatment facility in the area that can properly treat her wide range of medical issues. At this point in her life with all her medical issues, her children are not able to provide the level of care she needs in their homes nor do they have the budget to take on the financial burden this might impose on them as they have their own children they are taking care of and providing for along with all the usual expenses any other family would have. Her children have said it would be great if she moved to California so they could see her regularly, and would go as far as to pay for the needed travel expenses and the cost to set her up in a Section 8 apartment, either where she lives or in California; however, she has to make the decision to do so, complete all required paperwork to do so, and ensure she is medically able to make the trip. Again, she has options, she just doesn't like any of them because none of them entail her staying in the county where her preferred hospital is located. She has been able to beat the system up to this point, but it will come full-circle very soon, and when it does, she will only have herself to blame when a state agency takes matters into their hands and forces her to move and live wherever they tell her she is going.
While this has all been very tough on this woman, it has also weighed heavily upon her children, especially as they tried many times in years past to convince her to move when she was in better health and more able to make such a journey, but she refused for the medical reasons mentioned above. And while their mother will occasionally say she wants to move to California when she feels her back is against the wall and is going to end up in a NH, in the end, she won't take the needed steps on her end to make it happen. Despite her children repeatedly explaining and encouraging her to make the move throughout the years, she continues to not want, in her way of thinking, to concede one once of her civil liberties and rights as an American citizen to live her life the way she wants and to make all her own decisions.
Her children, as some of you have already mentioned, have decided to let her do it her way and just let the chips fall where they may. Yes, they worry she might try to take her own life at some point and they worry about her general health every day, but there is not anything they can do about it. They are not about to try to file some legal guardianship papers with the courts that are likely to take a very long time to be processed and which are likely to be very costly too, especially as they know their mother would not be able to withstand the stress of a court trial, and even if she did, and regardless of the outcome of such a trial, she would likely never want to talk or associate with her children again--so in the end, it would all be for not and not worth the emotional distress such a trail would put on everyone involved.
We've all heard these tragic stories before, and while the storylines may be vastly different, they still bewilder us as to how does a person come so destitute, especially when they surely must have family and friends somewhere who could help them. In this case, she has always had the support she needed, she just did not want it because the ideas, recommendations and/or support offered was not exactly what she wanted and/or on her terms only.
Again, I thank everyone for their thoughts and concerns, and I hope you or anyone else never has to go through something so emotionally draining as this with anyone in your families.
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BarbBrooklyn: Yes, I saw that, but at one point she says "move out of the country" making it a confusing post. Yes, this poor lady is being pushed around by the hospital that you say that you think you know and if she's acrimonious to begin with, it's not going to benefit her goal (should she even have one).
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"Move out of the county", LL. She wants to stay in the county where this hospital is that has a revolving door.

I think I know which hospital, based on remembering the details of the fire. They have a peculiarly ineffective social services unit and simply kept sending my uncle with dementia home without adequate care for years.

Any other hospital would probably apply for emergency guardianship of this poor woman, so that her medical, safety and mental health needs could be addressed.
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This is confusing as you say "she has to move out of the country." And then you say "unable to move from (coast to coast). She's going to have a hard time relocating since she seems to be an acrimonious person.
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As for the professor flipping burgers...I say flip burgers but keep on looking for that better position. Anything can be withstood if you approach it as a stepping stone. Perhaps she can be convinced to apply for medicaid and enter a nursing home as a stepping stone until Section 8 housing in the county of her choice once again becomes available. It's simply not true that all nursing homes are dying centers... there are people in nursing homes in rehabilitation who have ever intention of moving on when the time comes. She can be one of those...
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She may find herself dying on the street before she gives in, sadly. I think this is the plight of many of the homeless. Bless you for caring, but I agree with Churchmouse. This may have to not be your fight to fight, lest you find your energy drained by someone who repeatably rejects your attempts to help.
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If she is in rehab that has long-term nursing attached, she could be evaluated and transferred to the N H section on Medicaid. Her family should make rehab aware that this woman has no place to go. This woman is not thinking clearly. She wants it her way and at this point it's not possible.
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