Can Medicaid take my home which was willed to me if my Mom who is on Medicaid lives there? - AgingCare.com

Can Medicaid take my home which was willed to me if my Mom who is on Medicaid lives there?

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I have never been on Medicaid but was told they can? We get letters all the time now the last few years saying estate recovery? Shouldn't Medicaid ask me before signing family member up before they can take something that belongs to me not her?

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We've spoken to 2 Attorneys both say they cannot touch it, but I still don't know why they are sending that paper work out. I will believe its good when its in my name and I can sell when ready w/o any incidents I'll let you know trust me! Thank you so much for all inputs its appreciated so much hugs to all!
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Sorry. There is some serious administrative mixup somewhere and you will be best served by consulting an elder law attorney. Bring all the paperwork you have regarding ownership of the house.

Medicaid does not have any rights to the house if it never belonged to your mother. I suspect that she listed that property as belonging to her on some form. Or is her name very similar to yours? In any case, see a lawyer and get this straightened out.
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So just who owns the house? This is confusing.
Like how does the tax assessor bill read? That usually is going to be who the state considers the owner to be.

If it reads your mom's name (or a life estate for her in some states) and she already has applied for & has Medicaid paying for her care if she is over 55, then the state is required to attempt to do estate recovery (MERP) to recoup the costs that the state's Medicaid program is paying for.

If you apply for & take Medicaid, you accept it's terms. Whether it means having prescriptions done as generic in 90 day pack or having the possibility a MERP claim or a lien on your assets after death (your home).

But if the house is in your name, (and has been for more than 5 years prior to mom's Medicaid application), then MERP cannot do anything as the house is not an asset of mom's.

Really get all the paperwork on the house and the letters your parent has received and go see an elder law attorney to clearly find out just what the situation is.
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If the house was never your parents' property, i.e. they never at any time had title to it, make sure any lawyer you speak to grasps that point early on. As an outsider, I would suppose that Medicaid can recover any assets your mother is entitled to, but not yours purely on the grounds that you're giving her somewhere to live.
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Ct, yes, you need a lawyer who understands Medicaid. Click on the Money and Legal tab at the top. And some free life advice from me to you...when someone official says something you don't understand, say, politely but firmly "I don't understand what you just said. Could you explain that to me, this isn't my line of work" You're not dumb because you don't understand "officialese". You're just like the rest of us. Good luck!
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You need the advice of an elder law attorney. If the house was put into a trust years ago, it's possible that it's safe from recovery. But you won't know that, and neither does Medicaid, until someone's looked at all the paperwork. Gather it together and make an appointment.
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Also, she once applied for food stamps and was turned down they said her money is Federal not County? What exactly are they talking about here? Thank you sorry not the best writer and so much going on not sure were to begin!
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I typed my additional info yesterday and I think I didn't do something right I don't see it on here. As for the Will it was made by my Grandfather, on my Dad's side for us. My Mom is living there has never owned house but was trustee at one time. It just seems pretty underhanded if Medicaid can take someones house without contacting them about paperwork when parents signed up? Neither I, my sister, or cousin was contacted reguarding this matter. The only reason I found out is I take care of my Mom and she got "form letter" about state recovery and to let family know? Seems pretty bad if they are having senior citizens with stroke and dementia filling out forms without proper consent from the "willed heirs?"
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I think you need to talk to an attorney, because if she is still alive, she could not have Willed it to you. Wills are for dead people.
If she goes on Medicaid, she has to list her assets and all finances for the last five years. They DO ask what she owns or gave away. Read the whole thing.
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CT - Just occurred to me, is mom still alive? I assumed mom had died and the MERP letters were based on that.

But if mom still alive, living at her home or in a nh but still has her home, and mom is on Medicaid, then her home is subject to a future MERP action. She would have had to legally sold, transferred or gifted the home to you 5 years before ever applying for Medicaid. Once on Medicaid, MERP is required to be done. House being willed to you is fine, but a will is subject to probate. So any claims or liens on the estate have to be resolved before assess can be transferred by probate judge.

All of the states are now at the point where some sort of MERP system is in place. Probate courts are more aware as are title companies. Often realtors don't know the full extent of MERP and how it totally can queer a sale.

The biggest change with MERP is that many states have outsourced it. No more a state employee doing it at whatever pace for their hourly wage no matter what the result. The contractors -2 main ones- are very very good at actively & legally enforcing the claim or lien and they make a % of the recovery.

If mom has a home, you need to figure out if there is a reasonable MERP exclusion, exemption or hardship that exists to make having the property become yours feasible AND have the documentation to support your exclusions, etc. If not, with the costs of NH & medical care paid by medicaid, it is likely you will not inherit the home. No matter what the will reads unfortunately.
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