Medicaid qualification and charitable deductions to a religious institution?

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I've done some research but haven't found definitive answers as to this question:

Will charitable donations, including extraordinarily large donations uncharacteristic with previous spending patterns, affect Medicaid lookback periods and be considered as "gifts"?

I've tried to call the local Medicaid office but it's closed for the holiday.

Thanks for any answers or insight into experiences on this issue.

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I think your assumption is correct, and makes sense. So there may be a distinction in amount and frequency. I still plan to call Medicaid on Monday to see what they have to say, although I expect it'll be an answer something to the effect "well, it depends on (a), (b), (c)" and on and on.

I will post an update on whatever (if anything) I learn, especially since I've never seen this issue addressed in the Medicaid qualification posts here so an answer right from the source might help others as well.
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I'm just guessing, but I suspect monthly tithing would be overlooked if it was reasonable. They might look with a bit of suspicion if the weekly or monthly donation was high, given the financial status of a person applying for Medicaid. I mean, if someone made a habit of giving the church $1000 a month when their income was only $2000, it may be questioned, even if it was normal for them. It would be nice to have some exact answers on what size donation would be considered okay.
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Jessie, so I'm thinking that perhaps monthly tithing that is habitual wouldn't be as much of a concern as a large lump sum, which fortunately isn't done habitually.

I know that sometimes regulations can be couched in so many "ifs" that despite a lot of research there are still discretionary issues left to the staff. My guess is there is some flexibility in Medicaid's decision, but it might also depend on what other gifts or issues exist.

Thanks again for your interest and help.
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More information, GA. Most Medicaid people do not consider tithing that is done weekly. They only consider larger gifts that are not being done habitually. Thank goodness! It does pay to read several things when it comes to certain issues. I wondered how Medicaid would penalize tithing in a country where a large percentage of the population does it.
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Glad, thanks for the encouragement. I did check 3 of my favorite seasonals yesterday - Hershey's kisses in candy cane, mint chocolate, and cherry cordial flavors but they were still too highly priced. Haagen Daz chocolate would work - I'll have to jump around enough afterward to keep warm that I'll work off all the calories!
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Thanks, Jessie, for the advice and for the research. Guess my long-term plans are really going to change.
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GA, it is Black Friday. There must be plenty of sales on chocolate that will take you through the entire year! If you see Haagen Daz pomegranate ice cream bars coated in dark chocolate, give them a try. MMMM, GOOD!
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I checked and, yes, tithes and offerings to a church are thought of as gifts during the 5-year look-back period. This definitely pits Caesar against God, doesn't it? The Bible says to give the first 10%, but Medicaid rules will count it a penalty. I guess that tithers will just have to assume the 10% penalty if it is included. I wonder if it ever really is or if workers tend to let tithes ride in this country.
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If you want to leave a legacy to a charity it is common to include it in the Will. You would have to be careful to word it so that it doesn't take precedence over other bequests (unless that is the intent). No estate left, no gift, but the thought was there ;)
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Thanks to you both. Your answers are what I suspected but don't have any background in Medicaid issues and just research online to see what I can find.

Glad, the charitable donations to Salvation Army, etc. are just of goods; it's the monetary donations that concern me.

FF, this is my concern as well; this money should be reserved for Dad's long term care, not donation to a well-heeled religious institution.

Back to the drawing board to recalculate long term projections.

Thanks to your both. It helps me revise the budget projections. Good thing I have a good supply of chocolate; I'm going to need it.
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