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Its hard for me to share a room do to my mental status and physical status also.

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Tired1of4: Really? Could you be any more less acrimonious?
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Hugemom: Kudos!
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...and thank you "huge mom for trying to report my comments as "personal attacks, (I assume it was you based on the fact the only comment that was removed was mine saying that "I assume you didn't "find ways around Medicare/medicade rules but rather the facility found other avenues, etc" ...and by you trying to have them removed although they are not even close to personal attacks it simply appears that you have a personal issue, with me, even tho we are strangers. If you have any further issues with me kindly deal with me via my profile... thanks.
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..cont; to "huge mom" .. and any mental health diagnosis that may accompany the poster, Medicade/Medicare will already have that info within their data based per his or her/his physician files... and if not yet, any facility will require the physicians history of the poster before allowing the poster to reside.
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...well "huge mom, I didnt ask why these pages and boards exist, and I can bet their original intentions were not to be giving wrong, misguided or confusing info, but theres allot of that on this and others ...and to be straight forward, this particular poster didnt ask for "experiences, she/he asked if Medicare/Medicade allowed this or that regarding rooms. That was a direct question that is better answered by the entity itself and then any facility this poster is interested in residing. Although I can understand you feeling the need to tell me what these "sites are meant for, based on much of the advice given on these "threads by means of "experiences (examples number into the thousands) the advice is not always healthy nor helpful, nor accurate. Now, when speaking in regard to Medicade and Medicare, stories will not matter their rules are governed by set regulatory commissions and they don't let them waiver to the side simply because of a story.
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Tired1, the reason for the pages and boards on this website is for people to get information from people who have already had these experiences and willing to share what we've learned. Medicare and Medicaid can only offer "rules are rules", and depending on the representative you get, some of them don't always, well...care about your issues. On this site, we can ask for suggestions from people who aren't bound by the rules of their company, and like I did with my mom, maybe find a way around those rules.
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... If you can type this question, why are you not calling and discussing with Medicaid/ Medicare directly.
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My mother never had a private room, neither while we were private pay or when we went to Medicaid when funds ran out. There were just a few private rooms at her nursing home, occupied by all private pay individuals. What worked for us was having a roommate, twice over the years, who was basically bedbound and out of it. It was quiet and peaceful from that side of the room. Actually sad to witness. But not any bother to my mother. If you can't get a private room perhaps a request for a certain type of roommate could be an answer.
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I think if you are willing to pay the difference out of pocket, some (not all) facilities have private rooms. But you WILL pay more. My sister is totally off board with mother's care, but quick on the draw with the checkbook. She'll pay anything to "solve" a financial situation and that's great. I think she paid $75 a day extra for mother to be in a private room when she moved rehab places. Mother could never afford that, but my sis didn't bat an eye. Money DOES smooth a lot of things over.
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My mother had Medicare and Medicaid and at one point, required a private room due to lack of compatible roommates (they were all much older than her and either wouldn't talk to her or were grouchy as heck and yelled at her). Medicaid paid the base room rate that they would pay for anyone, and I had to foot the bill for the rest. With no help from family members, it left me paying over $450 a month on my own for her private room. About a month before she died, they finally got a compatible roommate and I had her moved to a shared room. The sad fact of the matter is, if you're in a nursing home, someone else has to die before you can get into a room with someone who may be more compatible as a roommate. That was the case here - the 2nd roommate passed away and Mom was moved into the room in her place.

Definitely look into this before making the leap to a private room. See if there are compatible roommates available.
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It really depends on the individual facility and the resident. My mom had a "private" room for about 75% of the 31/2 years she was there. She was very anti-social and constantly felt threatened by her roommates. At one point, she became physical with a female roommate who had short hair. Mom was very afraid of men (part of her dementia) and thought her roommate was a man. That's not to say that your should smack someone to get a private room, but somehow the facility shuffled papers, consulted with their doctor on call,,and made it possible for mom to be in a room with no roommate although it was not advertised. She did have to switch rooms multiple times and unfortunately that contributed to her confusion and disorientation, not to mention that each time she changed rooms, some of her possessions were lost. The staff at the facility was very kind and understanding of Mom's social and mental issues. I truly believe it depends on the facility and how they handle their paperwork. And, on the in-coming resident and how that person presents their issue.
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Peruse Medicaid.gov for your answer.
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Sometimes rehab facilities have lots if available rooms and another may only have 1 bed. When you talk to the discharge coordinator. Ask them to enquire about window views and private room availability so that it can be reserved. This mainly works when you are being disharged within 24 hours. Also contingent on what facilities are inder your Medicare. Most facilities have shared rooms. Private rooms have priority for isolation patients and if it happens in the facility, you still may have to be moved. Once you are there, if you do not like your arrangements, you can request a change in rooms.
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Midkid- I know what you mean. Six years ago my father spent five weeks in rehab. It was an old building with a floor plan like spokes on a wheel with the nurses station in the middle. My father had a private room and to my surprise it was bright and cheery with a large window that looked in to a rhododendron garden. So about 18 months ago my mom gets sent to the same rehab. Moms room was down a different hall. I was surprised this time as well but not in a good way. Mom had a roommate who already had the bed next to the small window that looked into the parking lot - she kept the curtains closed and I didn't blame her. The room was dark, looked like it hadn't been painted since the day it was built, smelled funny and basically couldn't have been more depressing. No wonder mom called me the first night having an epic tantrum! To this day I wonder if the hall my dad was in was the one "for show" and I shudder to think what the other halls were like. My parents had the same insurance so I don't know why they got such different accommodations. But yeah - how could anyone be cheerful and motivated in such a depressing atmosphere- unless it's to get the heck out of there?!!
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My mother had private pay AND it was extremely "good" insurance, and although she was PROMISED a private room for her rehab stay, she wound up in a nasty room with a roommate. By "nasty" I meant, they'd spruced up the part of the rehab center for "show" and the rest of the place was just as depressing and dim as it was 30 years ago. It took almost a week, but we moved her to a nicer facility.
The roommate is who I felt sorry for, she was obviously a "long termer". Mother never spoke to her, so I don't know.

My guess is Medicaid is going to do what they usually do: the bare minimum. It could have been worse--some rooms were larger but held 4 patients.

Do let the administration know of your physical and mental needs: I think had mother been more amenable and nicer she might have gotten her "private" room. Good luck!
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The Medicaid reinbursement rate for room & board by & large is pretty low. National average is abt $ 180 a day. Profit margins to run NH are pretty narrow and co-sharing is one way to manage costs. But some states do allow for private room for Medicaid residents as those concerns for "privacy" have been heard. Usually there will be an up charge to private pay rate paid by family with a contract signed as to responsibility. Google Iowa / private NH room / medicaid to see how Iowa is approaching this.

If your state is not doing this (each state administers it medicaid program uniquely but within overall federal guidelines), then in my experience you've got to get creative. Like my moms 2nd NH had it so the rooms at the end of each wing that abutted the stairwell were too small for 2beds do they were single rooms all OK for Medicaid (& these usually had 1/2 of a married couple where he was in theNH but the wife still in the community & they would often spend a nite...). For my MIL her old NH in New Orleans was in a historic district and the rooms were all singles & dorm room big but with jack & Jill style big bathroom between 2rooms, and totally ok for single room paid by Medicaid. One of the NH I looked at for my mom & aunt was another older one which actually was built with a wing of "isolation rooms" which were single ok for Medicaid resident.

Pls keep in mind that it could end up that having a "roomie" is a good thing for your parent as they help each other remember dining & activities times.
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Medicaid does not specify how many people are in a room. It simply specifies how much it will pay, and that generally is a rate that is lower than even a shared room, so care centers typically can't provide a private room.

If you need a private room for medical reasons, discuss this when looking at care centers.
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