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I live in NY and my sister lives in MA. My mother currently resides in NY and will be moving in with my sister in MA within the year. We are trying to get a handle on things regarding assisted living etc for the future. Can I pay the difference between what Medicaid covers and what the long-term facility charges in NY? What about MA?

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Mass.gov has handy downloadable brochures on senior housing and Medicare.
Since you are not specific on needs start there. You will find that housing for independent through nursing home are less costly than N.Y.. The reason is that the facilities are based on a social model where residents have more access to social group programs. The model lacks in medication and higher skilled care. Injections have to be self administered with supervision by the resident. The way to work around it is by private hire.
For Medicaid inquiries the contact the MA services to see if she can have a special enrolment since you are past the enrollment period
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Something I've never understood. Does the lien that medicaid put on a house force a sale or is it only there in case of a sale?
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Suzanne, each State handles their Medicaid differently regarding what programs they have, so it would be best to contact Medicaid directly.

Usually if a person cannot afford to be in a skilled nursing home, Medicaid will pay for all the care. But if Mom has assets, after she passes Medicaid will put a lien on Mom's house, if she has one, and other assets. Some items are exempted. Again, each State is different.

If your Mom is using Medicaid, you need to start early with getting Mom approved for Medicaid in Mass. Because Medicaid in your State doesn't cross State lines. It doesn't with any State.

As for paying for difference between what Medicaid covers and what the long-term facility charges, again you need to check with Medicaid.

You may also want to talk with an Elder Law Attorney in both States, or one who is licensed in both States, to see what are the current rules and regulations.
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