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She wants to walk home and we have to physically hold her back. She is so determined to walk away. Anything in a patch form that works since she won't eat or drink during these periods. already on anti-depressant meds. can't redirect her when she does this. its not b/c of UTI. she forgets the episode the next day.

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It is all trial and error. Some people are lucky enough to get hospitalized while they are getting the right cocktail but that depends on your insurance. What works wonderfully for one may not work at all for the next. I have seen Namenda work wonders and also seen it get patients totally psychotic on a small dose. All these medications do is control behaviors but when they work correctly it is magical for the family members.
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I know people knock Namenda, but it was a godsend for us. Settled Dads agitation right down, drowsiness only lasted a day or so. He is soo much better now, and easier to deal with. His sence of humor is back, and he is more coherent
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thank you everyone--we do have apt at geriatric psychiatrist next week--wanted some possibilities to ask about while we are there--she seems to be settling down recently so hope this continues.
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Mar126...Namenda XR is available...that is the only 'official' med my mother is taking. I don't believe in giving med upon med to solve problems...it just compounds them. try natural approaches and redirect to calm him...
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Veronica91 is spot on. This can be very complicated. What works well for one person may not work for another. Also what works well for solving this problem may cause other problems. Seniors with chronic conditions in addition to dementia have a difficult time processing meds through their system. A drug that calms her and helps the immediate anxiety may stay in her system longer than it does in healthy people causing other problems like dizziness or confusion days after it is taken. Their is no easy answer here. Good Luck.
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bonade, The patch is Exelon, used for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's dementia. sooz, I think you mean 'Rescue Remedy' which is a homeopathic formula for anxiety.
celeste, work with your MD to find the right meds.
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There is a herbal help called Rapid Remedy. Get it at a health food store. You give 4 drops in water. It's helped my mother who has a similar condition as you described. It's also good for pets; helps to calm the agitation, especially Sundowners. Alzheimers.org has a registration for wandering too just in case she gets away from you.
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We recently switched Mom to the medicine whose name starts with an "E" and comes in the form of a patch. So far, no adverse reactions...
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Check the side-effects listings for everything she is taking, and have a pharmicist check the list for possible bad combinations. My sister-in-law went home from the hospital after replacement of a neural shunt to her daughter's, but kept escaping and trying to walk home. Daughter gave up and took her back to her own house with a caretaker. Not ideal, but we were aware that any other placement would make her totally disoriented and generally worse.
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I had to pull my mom off Namenda as well. She couldn't stay awake. They also put her on Aricept that has help for a while but the dementia is progressing quickly along with wanting to sleep all day and stay up all night, something I can't do employed. my disabled partner and sitter try to keep her up during the day but she is defiant. I actually took her cigarettes away from her last night and told her there would not be any available after I go to bed because she is burning her clothes etc I said it kindly but stern and seh tells the sitter this morning "I balled her out". She knew this was not correct but mom with use this stuff to get what she wants. It has gotten to the point I'm thinking nursing home because I'm at my breaking point mentally and financially. Going to try one more home health to see if we can get some assistance to keep her at home...I'm doubtful though :(
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My husband tends to do the same thing, wanting to leave to go who knows where. I noticed that his hands become cold before these anxiety attacks. When they occur, I sit very close to him on the sofa and put my arm around him and do something like play cards or watch a TV program to distract him. Once he gets to the point of wanting to leave, it is hard to distract him so I try to catch it early. I agree that Namenda seems to cause this, however, without Namenda, my husband cannot comprehend anything that is said to him. Namenda XR seemed to have less side effects than the immediate release version. For some reason, Namenda XR is not available in spite of all the advertisements.
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All patients are different, what works well for one might work badly for another. A good Neurologist is a must, and even at that there will be trial and error. Ultimately families seek a Memory Care facility, often out of sheer exhaustion.
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Talk to her doctor. We cannot prescribe medications to her. Calm yourself when she is like this so you do not aggravate the situation.
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The short answer is "Yes there are lots of them"
However specific advice is beyond the scope of members of this forum unless there is a Neuoro/Psychyatrist specializing in dementia lurking under a stone in our midst.
The list of medications is long and convoluted some of which are specifically designed for the possible control of the agitation that can accompany and some that are what are called "off label indications" meaning that they are approved for one use but have been found to be helpful for other conditions. Also something that worked for one may have the opposite effect on another. It is a big game of trial and error and not a job for the average MD. Training and specialization is the clue so you have to educate yourself and take advice from the Drs you know to find the right help.
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I second what Maggie said; make sure that your mom is being seen by a geriatric psychiatrist for behavioral disturbances. It may be that one antidepressant isn't enough, or that she's not on the right one. Not all behavioral problems associated with dementia can be "solved" but if there is a change in mental status, you need to talk to the doc.
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Is she on Namenda? Honestly? I don't like that drug, and it seems to be one of the first out of the box today. It's advertised EVERYWHERE. Mom was put on it just before she left the rehab facility to move home with me. She acted crazy; mostly sleep disturbances . . . but napping during the day? Same thing. I stopped it. Her strange behavior stopped in three days.

I think all of these meds are trial and error. Are you working with a geriatric specialist? That's where I'd go. I don't want a guy trying to solve difficult problems who doesn't specialize in seniors and dementia. That's a whole separate ballgame.

I wish you very good luck.
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