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As caregiver to a loved one in a facility (AL, NH, MC,) have you checked on and followed through on their measles status? Were they conferred immune by having the measles? Did they have a vaccine many years ago? Will they need a booster, or another vaccine?


What about visitors to facilities who may be younger?


Are the staff (all staff) required to be up-to-date on vaccines?


As a caregiver, have you immunity for yourself?


What about those caregivers with elderly parents and children living at home?


How urgent do you consider reports of measles outbreaks in the world?


How do we decide to get our elderly immunized or not?


Without panic, or overly generalizing, have you thought about this, and do you have a plan?

Such a confusing and controversial issue with vaccines. I got all the required vaccinations for my kids. I had the ones available when I was a child. We had the childhood diseases, measles, mumps and chicken pox.

Back then, moms sent their kids over to catch childhood diseases from others to get them over with because it’s worse if adults get it.

When I had chicken pox my I remember that my friend’s mom drove her son over to my house to spend time with me so he would be exposed to it.

Isn’t shingles related to chicken pox? I have heard that is very painful. It’s a virus, right? There’s a vaccine for that too.
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Reply to NeedHelpWithMom
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Here is one time that a blood test is supposed to be a positive result.
The antibody titer (blood test) came back POSITIVE!

My hubs does have immunity to Rubeola,(measles), as shown by the presence of antibodies to the virus.

P.S. Always respectful of his rights and privacy, as well as HIPPA law requirements, I asked his permission to share his lab results.
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German measles is also known as Rubella.
quote:
"Rubella is not the same as measles (rubeola), though the two illnesses do share some characteristics, including the red rash. However, rubella is caused by a different virus than measles, and is neither as infectious nor usually as severe as measles.May 4, 2018"

Ah....love the measles facts. Hoping the internet is correct.

Disclaimer: You can do your own research.
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Tothill May 11, 2019
Rubella is not as infectious as Measles, but can be deadly to a Fetus. It is recommended that all women of childbearing years be tested for immunity to it or receive a vaccine. At least this is the procedure in Canada. When I was pregnant the first time and they checked me for immunity is when I discovered that I was not protected. I have a friend who lost a pregnancy due to a child bringing Rubella into her classroom.

When I was a babe, there were no vaccines for Measles, Mumps and Rubella. I got 2 of the 3 as a child. When my oldest was a babe a combo vaccine was given at 12 months.
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My hubs has had an immunity titer, waiting on the result.

Do not know about myself because I have not been to the doctor yet this year, therefore have not met the Medicare deductible. I am thinking about this.

Today, the news has reported: L.A. County is the second most vulnerable for a measles outbreak. Sorry, no further details.

Keep talking everyone.

Do not panic.

The HMO providers will be panicking because they likely did not appropriate titer blood tests in their budgets. They now have a measles recording when you call.
DH was required to have a doctor's appointment for the blood test. They put up blocks, asked in an intimidating manner why we thought he needed the test.

Could not find out if the test is covered by insurance.......it is still early, maybe no one "knows" yet.
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Was also wondering about this. I am a child of the 1950s and never had measles but did have German measles. I looked this up on the internet but nothing was very clear as to if I am also immune to the regular measles at my age.

I was the kid who use to get childhood illnesses not during the school year [had perfect attendance] but during summer vacation :P
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Sendhelp May 10, 2019
Thank you Fregflyer!
Guess we are all going to find out.

Maybe a nurse specialist in vaccines will show up on our thread.....

So interested to find out if elderly 65+ need to be tested, or even immunized.
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So, this is good to know. I had no idea that I needed to be tested. I had measles and then had TWO rubella immunizations. (I got regular shot and then they offered it at school with the injection gun and I didn't want to be left out, so, got another one. lol) I thought I was covered, but, maybe not. That was in the 70's.
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Sendhelp May 10, 2019
Thank you for that Sunnygirl.
Do you know if it was rubella (German measles) or rubeola (measles?) that you had?
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You can have a titer done to determine if they have the immunity. Have it done when they are pulling blood for something else and it will be less traumatic. Around here we can go to a company called "The Shot Nurse" to get complete blood work and titers, and vaccinations as needed. From what I understand the shot is not recommended for anyone with a compromised immune system and that would apply to an awful lot of those in nursing homes. I guess I'd ask the doctors opinion before actually vaccinating but a titer won't hurt anything.
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Sendhelp May 10, 2019
Thank you faeriefiles!
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Here in Canada, the recommendation is that if you were born between 1970 and about 2000, you may need a booster shot. If you were born earlier, you likely have immunity either from having had the Measles or vaccination. There is no recommendation for the elderly to be vaccinated.

I know I had Measles as a child, but I did not have Rubella and had to be vaccinated against that after I have my first child. Rubella is not the same as the Measles in the news today, but can cause a woman to lose a pregnancy.

My kids were born in the 80's and 90's and have chosen not to get the booster shop.
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Sendhelp May 10, 2019
Thanks Tothill for that information.
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I would encourage everyone to get a blood test to confirm immunity is still present. I actually had measles as an infant and was also immunized as a child but did not test as being immune earlier this year (the only immunity I expected to have and didn't). I had the two dose vaccination and now test immune. My 87 yo mother tested as immune and didn't need the additional vaccination. Mom and I have also had both shingles vaccines since we both had chicken pox in childhood.
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Sendhelp May 4, 2019
Thank you Techie!
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There is a blood test that can be done to detect if there are still antibodies present in the blood and whether another immunization is necessary. I’m 65 and had that blood test recently. I am still immune. I worked in a daycare center and that test was a requirement of employment. You can always ask one of the staff if it’s required of them as well. If your LO has their immunity checked and it’s valid, you need not worry if everyone who comes into their facility is immunized.
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Sendhelp May 4, 2019
Thank you Ahmijoy!
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