Me again, don't know what to do. Will he suffer more than benefit?

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I've been stressing over this subject for awhile and seems to don't know what to do. My dad is 81 with chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease and also diabetic. Upon discharging from hospital his EF is 10-15%. He got sent home on hospice. He doesn't look deathly ill besides occasional tiredness and little twitching and minor muscles pain, he seems normal. I want to take him to see other doctor or cardiologist for second opinion or evaluation but in order to do that I have to stop hospice (I know I can get back in later). But with daddy's conditions and age, are they gonna be doing anything besides medications? Will they do any invasive surgery in his heart? Will it damage his kidney causing more complication? Will he suffer more than benefit? If it's not really helping him then I don't want to drag him around for nothing.

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I agree with JoAnn. If they need to use contrast dye that may very well put his kidneys in failure and he’ll end up on dialysis.
I don’t know any physician that would even attempt a stent with an ejection fraction of 10-15%. I would stay away from that one.
Most Doctors don’t write orders for hospice lightly and with the clinical info you provided he made the correct choice. He did talk with you, correct? You stated you weren’t there at discharge. 
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If a doctor released him to Hospice then he felt there was nothing more could be done. There is nothing that can be done for heart failure or his kidneys other than transplants and they won't do them at his age with his health. The heart is not pumping well enough to get oxygen thru his system or the water out of his body. His kidneys aren't working well enough to do their job either. The diabetes probably contributed to the problems and will continue to do so. I think you need to spend as much time as u can with him. The Hospice Nurse is able to tell you what is going on and what to expect. Hospice should have a counselor to help you deal with what is happening. He will be kept comfortable and pain free. I feel he needs to be where he is at this point.
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Nikki, it should be very easy for you to talk to someone on his hospice team. That always includes a social worker. Call the number you have been given and ask for a home appointment with this person. They can explain everything about the hospice program and answer any questions you have about it. It sounds like you may not have had a chance to do get the information you need at the beginning.

There is also a chaplain on the team. Would a discussion with them help you?

Even though he doesn't understand the hospice program, what is Dad's attitude? Does he want to look for other opinions? How does he feel about seeing other doctors?

Of course you want your father to improve, to get well. It is what we all want. But we all also want what is best for our parents and loved ones, and when it is not possible for them to get well we are very conflicted about what to do.

It sounds like you've already had a second opinion -- one doctor said no to the stent and another doctor said let's try it. If you go out for other opinions, you'll still have to decide which one to go with.

My heart goes out to you.
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My dad didn't know hes in hospice. He don't know what hospice is. At hospital they they tell us the pro and con of getting the stent but I guess we're afraid of the contrast dyes affecting his kidneys so we (mainly I) kinda talk him out of it because one doctor said we shouldn't and another doctor decided to proceed. We/they ended up going nothing and suggested hospice because hes not a candidate for the procedure. I wasn't there when they discharged him so I wasn't able to asked questions or opinions. A lot went on at the moment I couldn't get my mind straight or process until a week later when it all hits me. I tried contacting ER physician but its harder then reaching president. He lived with me which is 2 hours away from the hospital he was at. I can't drive back there because I have to take care of him at my house. That's why I want to get opinions and feedback to see if I should "start over" with him again.
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Who agreed to hospice? You? Dad?

This is very tough stuff but if his doc has recommended Hospice and this has been agreed to you should stay the course and not remove him and drag him around for more appointments.

None of his ailments are going to be cured. The objective at this point is for care and treatment to keep him as healthy and comfortable as possible. This is what Hospice is for.

Sit down with the Hospice nurse and have a talk.
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I don't know what the medical professionals will suggest. But here is a good starter question: What does Dad want?

If you "drag him around" to a doctor who suggests an invasive procedure, would your father want to go head with it? Does he understand that he is on hospice care? Does he want to continue looking for curative measures, or is he accepting of his current status?

I hope someone with experience close to yours will answer the medical side of this. But I think your fathers attitude and wishes should be taken into account.
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Nikki, have you asked his current doctors any of those questions?
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