Man (80) often accuses caregivers of stealing or trying to kill him. Any advice?

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He is not taking any medication. For past 20 years has often accused family members of taking his belongings. Since my mother passed away, he has accused me of murdering her, has accused the home health aid of trying to kill him, of stealing his million dollar lottery card (which does not exist), has been contacting area banks because he is convinced that he is a millionaire. Went to FL by himself on the bus and was committed under the Baker Act in September and released after a week's stay. Cannot convince him that he is not being rational. What to do before management determines that he is not able to live unassisted in the senior complex?

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I agree with the advice already given. You cannot reason with him. If you can have him evaluated by a geriatric mental health professional this person should be able to advise you.

Several types of dementia can cause this kind of behavior but so can other illnesses. There can be a mix of things going on, which just makes it all more complicated.

Please do start looking for a care center that can handle his condition. It's possible that, with proper medication, he can be more clear in his thinking, but much depends on what is wrong. Only after a diagnosis can he be treated. You've had enough crises already - you'll want to place him if you can so that he can get the care he needs.

Please keep us posted,
Carol
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I think he is not able to live unassisted in the senior complex.

What did the psych ward in Florida conclude about his health? Was there a recommendation for his care?

These kinds of delusions are not uncommon in dementia. I suppose that they could be associated with other mental illnesses, too. Have you taken him for a medical evaluation since he is back from Florida?

Before he is forced to find other lodging it would be, I think, a good idea to start looking for a care center for him, so you are not doing it in a crisis situation. But to do that it would be very good to know what his mental health is like, a treatment plan, and prognosis.
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Trying to reason with a mentally impaired person is a waste of breath and creates unnecessary stress for everyone. This man should be evaluated by a geriatric specialist before decisions are made for his future care. Blessings to all concerned for a speedy and peaceful resolution to this challenge before he hurts himself and/or others.
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My mother and father are in different nursing homes in different cities....they both consistently think someone is stealing from them. I agree there is no point in trying to reason with them. At first. I called the social worker about dad's accusations. Items would be found in his room or in the laundry ....he had left them in a pocket. It's frustrating to listen to the constant accusations.
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This is definitely a mental health issue. It's either dementia or schizophrenia or another mental illness. Try again to have him committed or evaluated by a psychiatrist or neurologist. He may try and harm himself or others. Do it NOW!
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Trying to talk to the elderly is a different story all together! They go with the first "idea" of a story that they've heard, albeit incorrect or not. And then they don't at all hear the correct version! It's a waste of breath and time, I agree, Gigi11! I can't imagine how your father went to Florida by himself, in such a state of mind as he is in!
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You give the IL facility full freedom to call 911 and have him admitted to the hospital where they can reevaluate him.
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My elderly father has the same delusions. Quite frankly, no psychotropic medications have been of benefit. In fact he generally stops taking the medications as he thinks they are poison. We simply allow him to believe as he will without challenging his beliefs unless the situation requires a different approach. We will tell him we knows he believes that way but that his belief is not supported by the evidence and then simply do what is necessary. It is a waste of time and stressful to everyone to try to convince him his paranoia is not grounded in reality.
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