My mother-in-law is possibly having lewy body dementia. How to make life easier?

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She had a stroke and heart attack since 2011. Through the years its been hospitals, rehabs and on repeat...She can barely move. its so hard :( bathroom visits, standing up, moving around, fears, focusing etc..she is like dead weight when helping her with a belt...she was good a few weeks ago moving around in the rehab but now is going down fast... any suggestions how to make life easier?

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Sounds like my mom. Answer from mar126 had lot of helpful advice, especially about the hospital bed. I strongly advise a continuous pump air mattress pad that will prevent bed sores, wish we did that earlier (we didn't and mom developed sores.) Turn and rotate her frequently, and get help learning how to transfer her properly. Even if she can't walk or move on her own, she may be able to bear weight on her legs to help you. Consider using memory foam wherever she sits or lies down (you can just buy a twin mattress pad and cut it to fit whatever furniture she uses.) Good luck, this is not easy.
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Having worked with elderly people, this makes me think of 2 possibilities. Either she had a form of dementia or may be she is developing a muscle disease. First start with getting her examined, but no with long stays at hospitals because problems started therefrom. Also old music from her younger years may push her up a bit. Music is a very good help for many elderly. If by any chance she should show from time to time some positive reactions, note them down for the doctors. Wish you success. Big hug from Antwerp, Belgium - Nicole
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Also if your mother is the widow of a veteran or is a veteran, she can qualify for Aid and Attendance. This means that there could be around $1100 to $1800 depending if she was married to a veteran or was a veteran.
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A friend of mine has parkinsons. He has begun a regimen of taking a tablespoon of coconut oil 3X daily. He said it helps him. Coconut oil contains medium chain trans fatty acids that help with alzheimers and parkinsons. It couldn't hurt. He mixes his in with cooked pudding.
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I have a similar situation with my husband. A year ago, my husband could walk 2 miles, now he cannot turn in bed or sit up without assistance. He can walk short distances with a walker as long as someone supports him from behind. His left leg has lost almost all its muscle mass and his right knee is extremely arthritic. At this point, I have decided to keep him at home and do what needs to be done to make it work. Here are my suggestions. If your MIL was in rehab, she should be eligible for "home health care physical therapy" under Medicare part A. When the physical therapist comes to the home for the PT they can also help you figure out the best ways to move her around. Some home care agencies will allow you to schedule one or two hour shifts so a caregiver can help move your mother in law, help with a shower and help with exercise. The charge is in the range of $18 to $24/hr. (I called 7 agencies before I found one that would come for only two hours) Over the past months I've made three purchases that have made my life significantly easier, an Invacare CS7 hospital bed with a mattress to prevent bedsores, a Nova 352 wheelchair (seat needs extra pad) and a Nova deluxe shower chair and commode that rolls right over the toilet. I had a walk in shower with a 4 inch lip... I found a tile guy who demolished the floor and laid tile almost level with the bathroom floor so I can roll in.
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From what she said, her MIL isn't weak and at risk for falling. She can't stand up or move herself at all. My husband is the same way. Lying flat in his bed started to be painful for him. He can't be turned onto his side, because that causes pain in his shoulders. The only place he is comfortable is in his recliner chair, so he stays in that 24/7. If he has to have a bm, I get him up with a Hoyer lift. I used to turn him in bed with a mat underneath him that has handles. All of this has made it very easy on me so I don't hurt myself. I have been doing this by myself for over a year. He doesn't need a lot of tending to, but does need someone present in case he needs something. I do go out and run errands, but never am gone very long. This has worked for us and it is not hard on me physically. You can do a lot by yourself if you have the right equipment.
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Regardless of what is causing her decline, it sounds like you are asking how to make things easier. Is that right? For her, I would say that if she is having fears and anxiety, to have her doctor discuss meds for anxiety. I'm not sure how to help her focus more if her mental decline prevents that. If her decline is progressive, then the physical therapy may not be helpful at this point. What did they say about it? She may be more comfortable in a wheelchair or geri chair.

With this much dependence on others for assistance, it sounds like you might need considerable help to come into the house. Is that feasible for you? I think I would have her assessed to determine what her needs are. That way you could consider your options for her care and determine if placement may be in order.
If she's very weak and has poor balance, falls are common. I would be very careful of that. Sometimes a wheelchair can prevent that.

If she is diagnosed, then you might be better able to determine what lies ahead in her progression.
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If she has lost her ability to get up, get into a chair, stand, walk, or reposition herself in bed, then she needs 24/7 nursing care. As this was happening to my mother, the rehab unit evaluated her level of need: 1, 2, 3 person assist.
Now, she is completely immobile except for her hands and very limited range of motion in her arms. She requires help to roll over or sit up more in bed.

This is not something I would be able to handle at home because I am not strong enough to assist. We would both get hurt.

My mother has dementia and a lot of damage from past strokes, so her loss of mobility had a reason.
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Are you thinking of Lou Gehrig's Disease, or maybe Lewy Body Dementia? I can't find anything about "lew beyer" disease. Can you explain a little more?

Why do you think she "possibly" is having this disease? Has that been suggested by her doctor?

Does she live alone? With you? In a care center? Are the major symptoms related to her mobility? Does she have cognitive symptoms also?

Tell us a little more about MIL's situation, and our responses can be more specific.
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