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Or, can APS help me? She has lost the ability to care for herself, she falls multiple times a day, and refuses help or to move. My mom takes a lot of narcotics and muscle relaxants for chronic pain, won't give any of it up, and my siblings and I don't know what to do. We are looking for solutions. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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A Power of Attorney is usually written to provide for the ability for another to assist with financial and contractual matters only. Sometimes provisions regarding healthcare are included but most often a separate document, a Health Care Surrogate or Proxy is created to handle these matters.
It is unlikely, but some documents require a determination of incapacity before an agent can act.
Savinggranny, offered great advice in terms of reviewing your mother's documents and enlisting professional support as opposed to traveling the legal route first.
You might also consider a geriatric psychologist or care manager to create a relationship with your mother and help her make appropriate decisions.
Contacting APS should be your last resort.
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I believe you can...reread the DPOA and ask her doctor for help. She may or may not be eligible for Assisted Living. Call your local council on Aging and get advice from them and her doctor. Good luck!
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What does your DPOA say? Maybe it's time for a complete medical workup, you can express your fears and let the doc know what's going on with her. You can ask the doc if he feels she's capable of making decisions, if not and the DPOA includes medical decisions then you should be able to arrange for placement. any decision you make must be in her best interest. Contact your local area agency on aging, ask about in home programs or caregiver programs that she may be available for. Also ask if there is an adult medical day care, even if she goes once or twice per week she may really enjoy it. It is difficult making decisions. If your mom is capable make sure she completed advance directives. It's important to plan ahead. My thoughts are with you, good luck.
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You've got to step in and make the decisions for her as she has (sadly) lost that ability. Also she is probably addicted.
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