Can a magistrate give me power of attorney over parents without their permission? - AgingCare.com

Can a magistrate give me power of attorney over parents without their permission?

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My dad can't care for himself. He is blind in one eye and almost blind in the other. He doesn't get around well, uses a walker and riding chair. He falls quite a bit. He has onset of dementia. He is also an alcoholic. He's 82 and drinks at least 1 40oz a day. My mom has vascular problems and has had artery bypass on one leg and needs it on the other. It's 5 months after the surgery and she still is healed completely. She now has gangrene on the toes from the poor circulation on the other leg. She has a hard time caring for herself but she is also caring for my father. I go to their house almost every day to cook, clean, pay bills, or shop. I also take them to doctors and whatever else they need. My brother lived with them and was a great help. He recently passed away. I have other siblings but they don't help much even though I have repeatedly asked for help. I am at my wits end and don't know what to do anymore. I have tried to talk to them about nursing homes but my father refuses to go and my mother won't go against him. In my opinion and others that know them, think she is pulling herself down taking care of him. I have been out of work for 5 months taking care of them but I have to go back to work. I don't want to see anything bad happen to my parents but if something doesn't change I'm afraid it will. I have contacted local social services for help but their income is too much (by$48) for assistance. I think they would both be better off in a nursing home but don't know how I can do that without their consent. I was recently told that I could go to the magistrate and tell them of the situation and I could get power of attorney over them. Does anyone know if this true? Please, any advice or help would be greatly appreciated.

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I would not try to do this "on your own". Your parents have to be able to give permission. You cannot appoint yourself.
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She keeps saying magnistrate. Are u from the US? If not, laws maybe different where u live. POAs are usually written up by a lawyer when an individual is of sound mind. That person appoints someone as POA. Can be a child, sibling even a lawyer. The POA comes in effect when the individual is considered incompetent to handle their own affairs.
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I did a search here on Aging Care and found this article that should be helpful.

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/how-to-get-guardianship-of-elderly-parents-140693.htm
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Do I need a lawyer or can I do this on my own? Do I go to the magistrate or who? Sorry for so many questions but I don't know how to do this.
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You will need to go to court and get yourself appointed guardian
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