Macular degeneration advanced stages. Any guidance on this?

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My mother has been diagnosed with advanced stages of macular degeneration, can't see certain numbers, they are missing are on top of each other. She can't read or see most anything in writing. We have to wait 2 months to see a low vision specialist for some possible aids to assist with her day to day life. She is 86, walks with a cane, and I am afraid that her not seeing will put her in jeopardy of falling. Is anyone working with someone who has this that can offer me any guidance, perhaps with aids? Any assistance would be appreciated. Thank you. She is in an independent senior living facility.

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08/28/16..... My Mom, who was 98, also had macular degeneration and she had had it for many years. One thing that did help her read was using a small LED flashlight. I tried large print but that took her too long to read because she was only seeing from around her eye, not in the center which was clouded. So regular print size darken seem to help. I had noticed that because when she wrote she was still writing in regular script size.

I tried the large floor model lighted magnifying glass but Mom didn't like how it looked in the room... decor issues.... [sigh]. She did use some light weight magnifying glasses that one holds in their hand, but that would tire her out. The hand held lighted magnifying glasses were too heavy for her to use.

One thing my Mom did she had full control of her kitchen. She wouldn't let Dad touch anything in the cabinets or the refrigerator because in her mind she knew where everything was... don't dare move anything on her.... which made sense. When I got her groceries, she would quickly put the items away.
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I forgot to add, a walker/rollator is probably a better option than a cane at this point.
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Some people cope better than others. One of the mercies of AMD is that it usually progresses slowly, giving people time to adapt. My mom was able to get along very well for years, despite a sudden bleed that robbed her of 90% of the vision in one eye and slow deterioration in the other. She could follow me when we were out without any hesitation at all, in fact despite her white cane we often had to tell people she couldn't see! When she began to fall it was due to increasing frailty from her other conditions, not her lack of vision.
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Consider moving her to Assisted Living. There she will have staff available 24/7 in case of falls. Meals are prepared so she won't be starting a fire in the kitchen. Safety is of utmost importance.
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So sad about your mom. The only Aid I recall are magnifying glasses. There is a website called activeforever that has these glasses and may have aids that could help.
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