Has anyone else's loved one with dementia experienced a broken hip and surgery?

Follow
Share

My Dad fell and broke his hip last week. We decided on surgery since he was a good candidate. We had to take him off hospice care for the surgery as the broken hip was considered a result of his dementia, which is his hospice-admitting diagnosis. Dad ended up getting a new ball and socket in his hip, as part of the hip bone had broken off rather than the hip sustaining a fracture. He was released from the hospital yesterday and re-admitted to hospice care (God Bless the folks who are part of hospice, they spent their entire Sunday afternoon getting this done!). His first day back was spent sleeping, which left us quite worried, but today he was awake, ate well and told us he needed to stand up! (The hospital staff only ever got him moved between the bed and a chair a couple of times, never had him walking, which I thought they had to do before releasing a patient?). Tomorrow one of the aides is going to get him up and into a chair and they'll begin some light therapy (we opted out of sending him to a rehab place because we didn't feel he'd get any better "therapy" than he does at his nursing home and with his cognitive problems a rehab place wouldn't have kept him around long!). We are very optimistic about Daddy's chances at a good recovery. Has anyone else (probably a stupid question!) gone through this experience, and if so, how did your loved one cope?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
26

Answers

Show:
1 2 3
NYC2015, have you consulted with an expert to see what your mom might be entitled to benefit wise?

Most of my LO's fractures did not require surgery and I'm glad, because she was not a good candidate. I have known a couple of people who had dementia, who had surgery and none of them did well. They actually were not able to survive for long. I'm not sure why, except they seemed to just go downhill physically, after the surgery.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My mom has LBD and has been in an ALF for the past 2 1/2 years. She's been falling quite frequently lately and this week she fell again and it was determined that she had fractures in both femurs. Day 1 after surgery and she's already refusing to participate in physical therapy. Let me backtrack, a therapist was also coming to the ALF to perform occupational and physical therapy on her, but she was resistant to that as well. She does not have LTC insurance so I've been spending down her savings. It's at a point now that she needs additional/memory care and I am hoping that I can get her into a skilled nursing/rehab facility and then apply for Medicaid. Otherwise, I have no idea what I'm going to do.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My mom is 83 and has some dementia. She fell at home and broke her pelvis in 2 places and has a back fracture. After she left the hospital with no surgurey, She went to a nursing home for skilled nursing abd rehab. She fell 4 times in a week because she kept forgetting she can't walk. Then she went wacko grim all the meds. they have her in there. Now she is in a behavioral psych. Unit to get the meds. straightend out. She only took 1 b.p. pill and a baby aspirin before the fall. Now she is on accept, namenda, remeron and lexapro! Whew! Seems like a lot. Still not walking and stuck in wheelchair and totally confused. Next of to a new nurseing home, hopefully without roaches. This is a long exhausting journey for all. Just wanted you to know that you are not alone. Dementia is awful. She just wants to go home.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Worried child I am afraid I do not have any reassuring words for you.
Any kind of proceedure on the elderly takes a lot longer to recover from even without the complication of dementia.
Depending on her general health before the surgery the Drs could consider some form of supplemental feeding or at least rehydration to see if that jump starts her recovery. I would not consider that as a long term treatment because if she is actually begining her journey to the next life it will only add to her suffering. I think you are at the time when you can only prepare for the worst and hope for the best. As long as she is pain free, not distressed and has loving family at her side that is really the best you can do right now.
It is a very worrying and difficult time and no one wants to loose a loved one but it is very important for you to take care of yourself and if you can't eat at least use nourishing drinks.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My mom is 88 and in late moderate stage of vascular dementia. She fell 2 weeks ago and broke her left hip. They had two wait 2 days to do surgery, as she is on Plavix and aspirin, due to carotid arteries being blocked, which has caused multiple strokes and TIAS. She did well for first two days after surgery, but then, after being given dilaudid for pain, she slept all the time. She was released to NH with rehab. She was in a memory care unit prior to fall. She is not drinking nor eating hardly anything. She has a catheter, due to her bladder not functioning. They plan to remove catheter on Monday and do a void test and then see urologist next day. Her urine is very dark, due to lack of her drinking water. She has most definitely declined in mental capacity. She cannot feed herself or hold cup. Sometimes she forgets how to use straw. At my wits end. She refuses or will not help when given therapy.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I want to thank everyone who took the time to share their experience. My Mom who is 85 and in the mid to late stages of Alzheimer's, fell last night and broke her hip. Your forum has provided insight and answers during this time of uncertainty.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I want to thank everyone who took the time to share their experiences. My Mom who is 85 and in the mid to late stages of Alzheimer's, fell last night and broke her hip. Your forum has provided insight and answers during this time of uncertainty.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My mum has Alzheimers but still recognises all her children. We are lucky in the way that all of us are able to see her regularly. She is in a nursing home and five weeks ago fell and had a hip operation. Since then she is not eating much or drinking much. She also suffers from diverticulitis and has had operations in the past for this which were very traumatic for her. This coupled with her inability to go to the toilet on her own is causing all sorts of problems like urine infection amongst other things. Saying that before the hip fracture she had no problems walking and we took her out regularly. Only recently has she started to walk with help and assistance with a zimmer frame but due to her being quite weak from lack of food and water intake she seems to only want to sleep even though she does perk up after some walking. She is receiving physiotherapy assistance a few times a week too.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

If your loved one has dementia and been through a hip operation, you should always start therapy as soon as possible. My mom has dementia and just had a hip operation, and the surgeon suggests to mobilize her as soon as possible. Hospital staff will not do much with the patient. You should get a physical therapist and have him come over like twice or three times a week. Always be there at the sessions and you will see what kind of exercises they are doing with the legs. You are then able to do the same exercises with your loved one every day. This save you alot of money. I had been to my mom's session everytime and do the exercises with her everyday that she is doing very well and right now i am training her to walk with the walker. You observe the therapist and you are able to do the same things with your loved one. My mom is 88, and she is doing very well right now..she even forgets that she had operated on her leg, and talks about walking by herself. I have to remind her everytime that she cannot do it by herself. She needs a peron to be present. Right now i am trying everyday to walk with her for 30 minutes. You cannot leave everything on the rehab.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My dad had this situation on new year eve 2014/2015.
it was bad terrible and whatever ugly word to describe it.
he was delusional agitated and not responsive. we tried all things and medications and physical therapy, but the doctors say he shall never return to what he was.
they all relate it to the general anesthesia. I recommend for any one who has Alzheimer or any type of dementia to have some sort of local or half anesthesia, an epidural or something. the results will vary a lot.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

1 2 3
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.